Category Archives: Domestic Violence

NM Fighter Accused Of Child Abuse

.jpg photo of man suspected of Child Abuse
Gilbert Cuhen, 31

Arrest made in Child Abuse case

TUCSON, AZ  –  A three-year old is in critical condition and an arrest has been made after a child abuse call Wednesday, April 26, when a woman driving her daughter to the hospital called 911.

According to TPD, 31-year old Gilbert Cuhen, the boyfriend of the child’s mother was arrested Thursday.

New Mexico MMA fighter faces child abuse charges

The mother told police everyone was home when she heard commotion in the backyard, when she went back to check she found her daughter unresponsive and drove her to the hospital.

On her way to the hospital she dialed 911 when her daughter was getting worse, according to TPD.  Police and firefighters arrived and determined the girl’s injuries were a result of physical abuse.

When police went to question Cuhen at the house, he was not there and it was later found out he left to New Mexico to stay with family.

While in New Mexico Cuhen did speak to authorities, according to TPD.

Cuhen drove back to Tucson Thursday after speaking with a detective in the child abuse unit at TPD over the phone.

After driving to the TPD station Cuhen was taken into custody and arrested on two counts of child abuse.

Children Subjected To Torture

.jpg photo of man that tortured Children
Joseph Myhre, 44

Montco Man Accused Of Child Abuse
Involving Pliers, Needles, Dog Shock Collar Facing Charges

LOWER PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP, PA  –  A Montgomery County man is facing a long list of charges on allegations he beat and abused his children for years.

According to charging documents, 44-year-old Joseph Myhre, of Greensway Circle in Lower Providence Township, home schooled his two children.

In the documents, police said his 11-year-old daughter told them going back to when she was 4-or-5 years old, her father would hit her on the head with sticks or PVC pipes.  He would strangle her and beat her head on the ground until she entered into a “dream state.”

The girl said her father would squeeze her fingers with pliers, stick needles in her fingers and toes, and use a dog shock collar that she said would leave burn marks.

The 13-year-old son told investigators that Myhre would kick him the stomach, or hit him on his feet with a stick that would cause him to bleed.  According to the documents, the boy also told police Myhre would put the dog shock collar on the back of his leg or on his stomach, then walk around the room acting normal while the boy was being shocked and yelling in pain.

According to charging documents, the children had wooden boxes for beds with a small opening and vents to let in air.

Investigators said an audio recording was found on a phone.  The recording lasts 53 minutes.  In it, the affidavit says a male voice can be heard calmly talking while children are screaming in pain.  The male voice is quoted saying things like, “He doesn’t care, he didn’t give me a hug for 10 minutes,” and “You can blame your mom for this.”

The affidavit also says there were white boards in the living room of the home with messages described as “threatening and manipulative in nature.”

The child abuse allegations came to light after Myhre’s wife was hospitalized with a broken skull.  While investigating that case, police interviewed the children.

Investigators say when Myhre was questioned by police, he gave a written statement saying he grabbed his children by the neck and arms, and hit the children with sticks.  The documents say he told police the children never cried or told him they were in pain.

According to the affidavit, Myhre said he put vice grips on his daughter’s fingers but only “playing around” to feel what it felt like to grip our fingers.

In addition to previous charges based on the allegations from his wife, Myhre is now facing twelve-counts of aggravated assault of a child less than 13, four-counts of unlawful restraint of a child, two counts of endangering welfare of children, and numerous misdemeanors.

He’s in the county prison on 1-million dollars bail.

The Sleeper

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It is a Father’s duty to teach and protect his Children.

They Called Down The Thunder:
A Father’s Right

No Way!… I hesitated just to needle him, as I had my whole life, stretching the moment, for I knew what I would see when I looked at Frank.

As I lifted my eyes, Orson Wells’ Time Machine started that clock-ticking whirling sound, and when I looked at him, there was the slight smile playing on the corners of the little boy’s eyes and whole face I knew so well.

When our eyes met, the smile covered his whole face.  He wanted it to be a true story, he needed it to be a true story, but how could this be possible, he had never heard it, and his big brother told him everything.

You went to the field house and not the office!  What did they do?
I finally quit agitating him and told him the whole story….

Many years ago, I was told the high school coaches were putting “the sleeper” on the players, and needless to say, I got very upset.  I called a good friend of mine and told him what was being done to our sons.

The next day we went to school, but not to the office, we went to the field house.

Things took a turn for the worst within minutes…. for them.

The first coach made the mistake of addressing us from a distance, and suddenly every boy knew why we were there.  The midget snapped at the boys, and continued impressing the boys with his one-handed curls, while approaching us with his big midget flexing bicep.  “You aren’t allowed in here, you’ll need to go to the office”.

“The office didn’t put these boys in the sleeper”.

It got worst by the minute…. for them.  The second coach stopped impressing the boys, and got up from the weight bench.  As he approached, he stretched and flexed his muscles.  He impressed the boys with his deep voice, “What’s the problem?”

“Some of you men put your hands on these boys, but putting these boys in the sleeper is wrong AND dangerous”.

Before we left, we had invited all the coaches outside, to put us in the sleeper, AND made it very clear that this sort of thing would never happen again or we would be back.

The Obama Administration, The Supreme Court, Our Law Makers, Penn State, the Jerry Sanduskys, and Dennis Hasterts of Our Country, are pushing their #AntiChild Agenda and #AntiFamily Agenda.

The following stories of school hazing involving sodomy should be all the evidence you need, as Good Parents.  I am adding one more story of a same-sex couple who killed a Child.  Domestic Violence is rapidly rising due to the perverse lifestyles allowed in public by Americans.

La Vernia tries to cope in wake of sexual assault arrests

http://www.expressnews.com/news/education/article/La-Vernia-tries-to-cope-in-wake-of-sexual-assault-11042457.php

LA VERNIA, TX – Last Thursday, Phillip Higginbotham was about to set out for a spiritual retreat in Burnet when he saw an article about the arrest of several La Vernia High School students.  As a youth pastor at La Vernia United Methodist Church, he works closely with the school’s students, many of whom gather at his weekly youth services.

Higginbotham hoped none of his students were involved, but did not think much else of it.  The weekend, after all, was supposed to be about disconnecting from the outside world.  The next few days, he didn’t have access to the Internet, his phone or even a watch.  But by the time he returned on Sunday, the town was in the throes of a full-blown crisis.

Seven student athletes, all of them minors, had been taken into custody on charges of sexual assault, as part of a police investigation into allegations of hazing among the school’s football, basketball and baseball teams.  Over the next few days, three more adult students would be arrested for allegedly sodomizing a 16-year-old teammate with the threaded end of a carbon dioxide tank before a football team dinner, as part of an “initiation” to the varsity team, arrest records show.

Hazing: An Outside The Lines Investigation

http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/story/_/id/17507010/otl-investigation-trend-sodomy-hazing

Hazing in America

Last year, Vermont passed “Jordan’s Law,” which requires school officials to report all hazing incidents to the Department for Children and Families within 24 hours.  Before, districts had been allowed to conduct their own investigations first.  Across the country, though, six states still have no hazing laws, seven have laws that don’t extend to the high school level, 13 exclude “athletic events” from hazing laws, and only one state, Nebraska, actually mentions “sexual penetration” in its hazing law. Below, a state-by-state breakdown of laws, as well as a listing of all the reports found by OTL of sodomy hazing in high schools since 2011.

What has to change?  Lipkins says there needs to be greater awareness and accountability, so that victims feel more comfortable coming forward and going to the courts.  “If we can’t break the code of silence, we’re not going to change things.”

FOR MORE, STREAM THE FULL EPISODE OF OUTSIDE THE LINES PRIMETIME ON WATCHESPN. PARENTAL DISCRETION IS STRONGLY ADVISED.

Mother, girlfriend charged in deadly Child Abuse case

http://www.ksat.com/news/mother-girlfriend-charged-in-fatal-child-abuse-case-san-antonio-texas

Cronyism In KY????

.jpg photo of victim of Domestic Violence
Julie Locke looks through records from her custody case in which a finding of child neglect against her ex-husband was reversed.

Child Abuse findings voided secretly in
Kentucky

“I don’t know how they think they are serving the public by keeping this stuff under wraps.”
Thomas Clay, Kentucky lawyer

Louisville, KY  –  Grabbing the teenage girl from behind, Kevin Watson, a security monitor for Jefferson County Public Schools, slammed her head to the table, opening a gash that splashed blood on the girl’s clothes, the table and the floor, according to accounts of witnesses at Breckinridge Metropolitan High School.

As he forced the girl’s head back to the table, Watson was overheard taunting her.

“How do you like that,” he asked the girl, then 17, according to another school security monitor who witnessed the September 2015 altercation.

Yet, despite a state Child Protective Services investigation that substantiated the incident as child abuse, Watson has a clean record with the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services, whose social workers issue findings in cases of alleged child abuse or neglect.

Using a secret process that not even victims may know about, Watson, exercising his right to a confidential appeal, was able to overturn the cabinet’s child abuse finding against him.  That kept his name from being added to an official list — also confidential — known as the state Child Abuse and Neglect Registry that can restrict adults from some occupations or activities, such as child care, working or volunteering with youths or serving as foster parents.

And data obtained from the cabinet by the CJ show Watson’s case is not unique.

Of the hundreds of people who file such appeals each year, more than half are successful in overturning adverse findings through the same cabinet whose workers substantiated the abuse or neglect, according to the records.  Appeals between 2012 and 2015 ranged from several hundred to nearly 1,000 a year, with anywhere from 56 percent to 66 percent being reversed or otherwise changed in favor of the person filing the appeal.

Because all proceedings are shielded by secrecy under Kentucky’s strict confidentiality laws regarding child abuse and neglect, it can’t be determined how the cabinet makes such decisions or who the cabinet notifies when someone appeals a case, including the alleged victims.  Watson, who still works at Breckinridge, did not respond to requests for comment.

JCPS officials say they can find no record they were ever notified of Watson’s appeal or offered a chance to submit the school system’s investigation, which also substantiated witness accounts.  Amari Walker, the injured student, never knew of the appeal or got a chance to participate, said her lawyer, Thomas Clay.

On July 6, 2016, the cabinet issued a single-page order with no explanation, reversing the abuse finding against Watson, according to records from his JCPS personnel file.

The cabinet rejected the Courier-Journal’s request for further records of Watson’s appeal, saying confidentiality laws protect its records of such proceedings.

Steve Davis, chief of staff at the cabinet, said the cabinet by federal law is required to offer people a chance to appeal findings of child abuse or neglect and state law requires that the records be kept confidential.

And while the law requires the cabinet to notify parties of an appeal, that generally applies to the person filing the appeal and the cabinet officials defending the findings, he said.  Davis said he knows of no requirement in the law that victims or others with an interest in the case be notified.

Julie Locke, a Louisville mother, was shocked to discover that her ex-husband successfully overturned a substantiation of child abuse or neglect related to their two daughters.  The substantiation stemmed from a 2014 finding by the cabinet that he had put the girls at risk during an incident in which he accosted Locke in front of them at a birthday party, grabbing, threatening and cursing her, according to a domestic violence petition.

“I never knew he filed an appeal,” Locke said.  “I never knew they were even entertaining an appeal.  For me not to have been notified is bizarre.”

Locke said that based on the cabinet’s reversal of its finding, a judge — over her objections — granted her ex-husband additional visits with their daughters.

Clay, who also represents Locke, said he thinks it’s time for such secrecy to end, that the state needs to revamp the laws and regulations that govern such proceedings.

“I don’t get it,” Clay said.  “They’re concealing information about the very people they are trying to protect.  I don’t know how they think they are serving the public by keeping this stuff under wraps.”

Walker, now 19, recently filed a lawsuit against JCPS and Watson. She said she still is in disbelief over the incident that left her with blood pouring down her face and required stitches.

“It was crazy,” said Walker, who now attends Doss High.  “It happened so fast.”

Davis said he can’t comment on individual cases because of the confidentiality provisions of the law.

In Kentucky, when someone appeals a substantiation of abuse or neglect, the case is assigned to a cabinet lawyer who serves as a hearing officer and typically holds a hearing, takes testimony and makes a written recommendation to the cabinet secretary on whether to uphold or reverse the finding.  The secretary makes the final call.

Davis said the cabinet relies on the judgment of the hearing officers and that cabinet officials don’t like to “tinker” with a case because people filing appeals are entitled to an impartial hearing.

“We expect them to issue sound decisions,” he said.

Some cases are settled through agreement of the parties or dismissed for various reasons without a hearing, according to the cabinet.

Dr. Melissa Currie, a pediatric forensic expert at the University of Louisville who occasionally is called as a witness at such hearings, said they tend to be informal, with participants seated around a table and the hearing officer in charge. She said she doesn’t know how the state reaches a decision.

“I don’t know how the system works,” she said. “There doesn’t seem to be any transparency.”

Currie said she has testified at hearings that involved what seemed to be obvious child abuse or neglect, only to find out later that the substantiation was overturned.

“There are cases that seem very clear-cut and they are overturned and we don’t know why,” Currie said.

Often, a lawyer represents the person filing the appeal.  Currie said she’s heard lawyers make arguments that don’t address whether abuse or neglect actually occurred but rather, appear to seek sympathy for the client.

” ‘This is going to ruin this guy’s life, he won’t be employed,’ ” Currie recalled one lawyer arguing.  “Of course, that should have no bearing whatsoever.”

State law says that the hearing officer should allow only “the evidence on the record” and exclude anything that is irrelevant or immaterial.

Acena Beck, a lawyer with the Children’s Law Center in Covington, said she had represented people at such hearings when she worked as a legal aid lawyer in Northern Kentucky.  Generally, the hearings are held in the county of the person filing the appeal, she said, and how they are run depends on who’s in charge.

“It can vary greatly depending on which hearing officer you get,” Beck said.  “There’s no consistency.”

Currie said she worries about the effect on social workers tasked with investigating difficult, complicated cases and reaching conclusions, only to have them overturned by the same cabinet that employs them.

“When a finding gets reversed, it undermines the investigation,” Currie said.  “It’s demoralizing.  They do all this work, they try to protect the kids.”

Locke said she’s still trying to find out how her ex-husband was able to reverse a finding against him.

His lawyer, Elizabeth Pepa, declined to comment, citing the confidentiality of the process.

“My client respectfully wishes for it to remain that way,” she said.

Locke provided the CJ with a copy of the Nov. 19, 2014, letter from the cabinet substantiating abuse or neglect, along with the 2014 domestic violence order she obtained against her ex-husband.

Locke said she was astonished when his lawyer in mid-2015 announced the finding had been reversed following an appeal she knew nothing about.

“How does anyone get a fair hearing if both sides are not represented?”  Locke asked.

Even more disturbing to Locke is the lack of any records of the appeal or an official explanation.

As a parent, Locke is entitled to confidential records involving her children of any hearing but when she and her lawyer asked for them, they found there were none.  A cabinet lawyer told her the case “was settled outside a hearing,” she said.

When they asked for records of the settlement, they received nothing, Locke said.

Seeking an explanation, Locke and Clay, her lawyer, said they met in December with cabinet officials who said they would look into it.

They are still waiting for an explanation, Locke and Clay said.

Some argue that at a minimum, the state’s confidential registry of people who have substantiated findings of abuse or neglect against them should be open to the public.

Among those arguing that case is state Rep. Dennis Keene, who is sponsoring a bill this year on behalf of a constituent whose infant daughter was injured by a babysitter in 2014.

Keene, a Democrat from Campbell County, said his House Bill 47 would require the cabinet to publish the registry on its website.

“It should be more transparent and accessible to the public,” Keene said.

Jennifer Diaz, the Northern Kentucky mother pushing for the law, said the babysitter was convicted of injuring her daughter and another child she cared for and sentenced to three months in jail.

Diaz said her daughter, now 2, recovered from the injuries that included bruises and head trauma.  But Diaz said she believes there should be a way for parents seeking child care to check out individual sitters or other adults around their children.

“It’s very important to us to get this passed,” she said.  “I want that registry to be accessible to the public so that everyone can see it.”