Category Archives: Indifference

Where Is Justice For 12, 6, And 2 Year Old?

Cottondale Child Sex Abuse suspect faces
Child Porn charge

.jpg photo of child predator
James Robert Pendley, 48, on five felony counts of first-degree sodomy against victims who were 12, 6, and 2 at the time of his arrest.

TUSCALOOSA, AL  –  A Cottondale man with pending child sexual abuse charges has been arrested for disseminating child porn.

Agents with the Alabama Bureau of Investigation’s Special Victims Unit arrested James Robert Pendley, 48, on Friday.  Pendley is facing one count of dissemination of child exploitation material and could face further charges, according to Lt. Brooke Walker, commander of ALEA’s Special Victims Unit and the Alabama Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.

Pendley is currently awaiting trial on a charge of first-degree sodomy and domestic violence.  He was arrested on May 10, 2017, and charged with first-degree sodomy and one count of third-degree domestic violence/assault, a misdemeanor.

According to court records, Pendley is accused of shoving and pushing a family member who caught him abusing a 6-year-old boy in the bathroom of his residence on North Davis Road on May 4, 2017.  A grand jury later indicted Pendley on five felony counts of first-degree sodomy against victims who were 12, 6 and 2 at the time of his arrest.

Tuscaloosa County Circuit Court Judge Al May revoked Pendley’s bond Friday, at the request of the Tuscaloosa County District Attorney’s Office.

The Special Victims Unit was assisted by the Tuscaloosa County Sheriff’s Office, Northport Police, the Joint Electronic Crimes Task Force, Alabama State Troopers, ALEA Tactical team and members of the SBI’s Alcohol and Narcotics division while conducting the child pornography investigation.

Plano TX Babysitter Caught Molesting Toddler

.jpg photo of man accused of Child sexual abuse
James De La Vega was arrested Wednesday, accused of sexually assaulting a 3-year-old girl, police say.

Moms walked in on baby sitter molesting
3-year-old girl at Collin County home,
police say

PLANO, TX  –  A Plano man was arrested Wednesday after two women whose children he was baby-sitting walked in on him sexually assaulting one of the children, police said.

James De La Vega, 50, faces an enhanced charge of aggravated sexual assault of a child.  His bail has not yet been set, and he remains in the Collin County jail.

The crime happened in the 200 block of Pagoda Drive in Anna, where De La Vega was baby-sitting three children whose mothers had gone out Tuesday night, Anna police said.

When they returned, they found De La Vega performing a sex act on a 3-year-old girl, Chief Jeff Caponera said.

De La Vega has no apparent previous criminal record in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

If convicted, he would face a prison sentence of 25 years to life because of a 2007 Texas law that increased minimum penalties in sexual-assault cases with very young victims.

Detectives from the Collin County Child Advocacy Center and the Anna Police Department are investigating the case.

We Want Net Neutrality

.jpg photo of Firefighter in California
A firefighter battling the Medocino Complex fire on August 7, 2018 near Lodoga, California.

Verizon throttled fire department’s
“unlimited” data during California wildfire

“Fire department had to pay twice as much to lift throttling during wildfire response.”

Update:  The Santa Clara fire department has responded to Verizon’s claim that the throttling was just a customer service error and “has nothing to do with net neutrality.”  To the contrary, “Verizon’s throttling has everything to do with net neutrality,” a county official said.

Verizon Wireless’ throttling of a fire department that uses its data services has been submitted as evidence in a lawsuit that seeks to reinstate federal net neutrality rules.

“County Fire has experienced throttling by its ISP, Verizon,” Santa Clara County Fire Chief Anthony Bowden wrote in a declaration.  “This throttling has had a significant impact on our ability to provide emergency services.  Verizon imposed these limitations despite being informed that throttling was actively impeding County Fire’s ability to provide crisis-response and essential emergency services.”

Bowden’s declaration was submitted in an addendum to a brief filed by 22 state attorneys general, the District of Columbia, Santa Clara County, Santa Clara County Central Fire Protection District, and the California Public Utilities Commission.  The government agencies are seeking to overturn the recent repeal of net neutrality rules in a lawsuit they filed against the Federal Communications Commission in the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Throttling affected response to wildfire

“The Internet has become an essential tool in providing fire and emergency response, particularly for events like large fires which require the rapid deployment and organization of thousands of personnel and hundreds of fire engines, aircraft, and bulldozers,” Bowden wrote.

Santa Clara Fire paid Verizon for “unlimited” data but suffered from heavy throttling until the department paid Verizon more, according to Bowden’s declaration and emails between the fire department and Verizon that were submitted as evidence.

The throttling recently affected “OES 5262,” a fire department vehicle that is “deployed to large incidents as a command and control resource” and is used to “track, organize, and prioritize routing of resources from around the state and country to the sites where they are most needed,” Bowden wrote.

“OES 5262 also coordinates all local government resources deployed to the Mendocino Complex Fire,” an ongoing wildfire that is the largest in California’s history, Bowden wrote.

The vehicle has a device that uses a Verizon SIM card for Internet access.

“In the midst of our response to the Mendocino Complex Fire, County Fire discovered the data connection for OES 5262 was being throttled by Verizon, and data rates had been reduced to 1/200, or less, than the previous speeds,” Bowden wrote.  “These reduced speeds severely interfered with the OES 5262’s ability to function effectively.  My Information Technology staff communicated directly with Verizon via email about the throttling, requesting it be immediately lifted for public safety purposes.”

Verizon did not immediately restore full speeds to the device, however.

 “Verizon representatives confirmed the throttling, but rather than restoring us to an essential data transfer speed, they indicated that County Fire would have to switch to a new data plan at more than twice the cost, and they would only remove throttling after we contacted the Department that handles billing and switched to the new data plan,” Bowden wrote.

Verizon “risking harm to public safety”

Because the throttling continued until the department was able to upgrade its subscription, “County Fire personnel were forced to use other agencies’ Internet Service Providers and their own personal devices to provide the necessary connectivity and data transfer capability required by OES 5262,” Bowden wrote.

Verizon throttling also affected the department in a response to previous fires in December and June, emails show.

Bowden argued that Verizon is likely to keep taking advantage of emergencies in order to push public safety agencies onto more expensive plans.

“In light of our experience, County Fire believes it is likely that Verizon will continue to use the exigent nature of public safety emergencies and catastrophic events to coerce public agencies into higher-cost plans, ultimately paying significantly more for mission-critical service—even if that means risking harm to public safety during negotiations,” Bowden wrote.

Update:  In a statement to Ars three hours after this article was published, Verizon acknowledged that it shouldn’t have continued throttling the fire department’s data service after the department asked Verizon to lift the throttling restrictions.

“Regardless of the plan emergency responders choose, we have a practice to remove data speed restrictions when contacted in emergency situations,” Verizon’s statement said.  “We have done that many times, including for emergency personnel responding to these tragic fires.  In this situation, we should have lifted the speed restriction when our customer reached out to us.  This was a customer support mistake.  We are reviewing the situation and will fix any issues going forward.”

Verizon also noted that the fire department purchased a data service plan that is slowed down after a data usage threshold is reached.  But Verizon said it “made a mistake” in communicating with the department about the terms of the plan.

“We made a mistake in how we communicated with our customer about the terms of its plan,” Verizon said.  “Like all customers, fire departments choose service plans that are best for them.  This customer purchased a government contract plan for a high-speed wireless data allotment at a set monthly cost.  Under this plan, users get an unlimited amount of data but speeds are reduced when they exceed their allotment until the next billing cycle.”

Verizon also said that the Santa Clara “situation has nothing to do with net neutrality or the current proceeding in court.”

Throttling happened after net neutrality repeal

Verizon’s throttling was described in fire department emails beginning June 29 of this year, just weeks after the FCC’s repeal of net neutrality rules took effect.

Even when net neutrality rules were in place, all major carriers imposed some form of throttling on unlimited plans when customers used more than a certain amount of data.  They argued that it was allowed under the rules’ exception for “reasonable network management.”  But while such throttling is generally applied only during times of network congestion, the Santa Clara Fire Department says it was throttled at all times once the device in question went over a 25GB monthly threshold.

Even if Verizon’s throttling didn’t technically violate the no-throttling rule, Santa Clara could have complained to the FCC under the now-removed net neutrality system, which allowed Internet users to file complaints about any unjust or unreasonable prices and practices.  FCC Chairman Ajit   decision to deregulate the broadband industry eliminated that complaint option and also limited consumers’ rights to sue Internet providers over unjust or unreasonable behavior.

Emails between fire department and Verizon

On June 29, Fire Captain Justin Stockman wrote an email to Verizon, noting that download speeds for an essential device used during large disasters had been throttled from 50Mbps to about 30kbps.

A Verizon government accounts manager named Silas Buss responded, saying that the fire department would have to move from a $37.99 plan to a $39.99 plan “to get the data speeds restored on this device.”  Later, Buss suggested that the department switch to a plan that cost at least $99.99 a month.

Stockman didn’t have authority to upgrade the plan, so he sent an email to Deputy Chief Steve Prziborowski that same day.  Stockman wrote:

Verizon is currently throttling OES 5262 so severely that it’s hampering operations for the assigned crew.  This is not the first time we have had this issue.  In December of 2017 while deployed to the Prado Mobilization Center supporting a series of large wildfires, we had the same device with the same SIM card also throttled.  I was able to work through [Fire Department IT executive] Eric Prosser at the time to have service to the device restored, and Eric communicated that Verizon had properly re-categorized the device as truly “unlimited”.

Prziborowski expressed concern about the throttling in an email to Buss.  “Before I give you my approval to do the $2.00 a month upgrade, the bigger question is why our public safety data usage is getting throttled down?”  Prziborowski wrote. “Our understanding from Eric Prosser, our former Information Technology Officer, was that he had received approval from Verizon that public safety should never be gated down because of our critical infrastructure need for these devices.”

While fire department personnel thought they were already paying for “truly” unlimited data, Verizon said they weren’t.

“The short of it is, public safety customers have access to plans that do not have data throughput limitations,” Buss told Prziborowski.  “However, the current plan set for all of SCCFD’s lines does have data throttling limitations.  We will need to talk about making some plan changes to all lines or a selection of lines to address the data throttling limitation of the current plan.”

The emails started up again on July 5 and 6.  “Can confirm that after using 25GB of data, our service drops to zero.  This is unacceptable and needs to be fixed,” fire department IT officer Daniel Farrelly wrote.

Buss clarified that “data throughput is limited to 200kbps or 600kbps” after 25GB of use.  Buss also told fire officials that all Verizon plans have some sort of throttling and that the department would have to pay by the gigabyte to avoid throttling entirely.

Buss wrote:

Verizon has always reserved the right to limit data throughput on unlimited plans. All unlimited data plans offered by Verizon have some sort of data throttling built-in, including the $39.99 plan.  Verizon does offer plans with no data throughput limitations;  these plans require that the customer pay by the GB for use beyond a certain set allotment.

The Mendocino fire began on July 27.  On the night of Sunday, July 29, Stockman sent an email to Bowden:

OES 5262 is deployed again, now to the Mendocino Complex, and is still experiencing the same throttling.  As I understood it from our previous exchange regarding this device, the billing cycle was set to end July 23, which should have alleviated the throttling.  In a side-by-side comparison, a crew member’s personal phone using Verizon was seeing speeds of 20Mbps/7Mbps.  The department Verizon device is experiencing speeds of 0.2Mbps/0.6Mbps, meaning it has no meaningful functionality.

Farrelly wrote a brief email to Buss that night, telling him to “Remove any data throttling on OES5262 effective immediately.”  Farrelly emailed Buss again the next morning, saying, “Please work with us.  All we need is a plan that does not offer throttling or caps of any kind.”

Buss responded that afternoon, suggesting a plan that costs $99.99 for the first 20GB and $8 per gigabyte thereafter.  “To get the plan changed immediately, I would suggest calling in the plan change to our customer service team,” Buss wrote.

That was the last email submitted in the court exhibit.

Santa Clara apparently switched to the $99.99 plan, more than doubling its bill. “While Verizon ultimately did lift the throttling, it was only after County Fire subscribed to a new, more expensive plan,” Bowden wrote in his declaration.

Bond Reduced After Luring Child From Home?

.jpg photo of man accused of kidnapping Child
Juan Andrade, 30

Bond Reduced For Two Illinois Men Charged
With Kidnapping Olive Branch Teen Lured
Through App

MEMPHIS, TN  –  An Olive Branch, Mississippi judge reduced bonds for two Illinois men accused of kidnapping a teenager earlier this month.

.jpg photo of man accused of kidnapping Child
Jason St. Aubin, 29

30-year-old Juan Andrade and 29-year-old Jason St. Aubin are charged with kidnapping and conspiracy for taking a 14-year-old boy from his home.  They both had $600,000 bonds until Tuesday.  The bond for Jason St. Aubin was reduced to $500,000.  Juan Andrade’s bond is now $300,000.

“That was just an agreement taking into account the appropriate circumstances, under the rules of criminal procedure,” says prosecutor Luke Williamson.

Olive Branch Police say the two Illinois men charged with conspiracy and kidnapping could face additional charges.  Local authorities along with the FBI are still gathering evidence.

Police believe the suspects used a video gaming messaging app to lure an Olive Branch, Mississippi teen from his home earlier this month.  The boy is safe, but the case is far from over.

“This is an ongoing investigation and does involve coordination with other agencies and so it is still in progress,” says Williamson.

The mothers of both suspects were in court Tuesday, but they didn’t talk to the media.

Once the investigation is done, the case will go to the grand jury who will then decide if the two men should be indicted on the charges against them.

Your Worst Nightmare As A Parent

.jpg photo of man who let child die after ingesting crystal meth
Curtis Collman was taken into custody after his son died from accidentally ingesting crystal meth.

8-year-old dies after allegedly mistaking
dad’s crystal meth for breakfast cereal

JACKSON COUNTY, IN  –  Prosecutors are hoping to put a man in prison for 50 years after his young son died from accidentally ingesting crystal meth.

Curtis Collman is charged with the death of his 8-year-old son, Curtis, Jr., in addition to facing charges for pointing a firearm, theft and failure to register as a sex offender.

On June 21, investigators said the second grader started eating what he thought was breakfast cereal on a plate after telling his father he was hungry.

Instead, police said the boy was eating crystal meth.  By the time he was done, Curtis had consumed 180 times the lethal limit.

“Just your worst nightmare as a parent,” Jackson County chief deputy prosecutor Jeffrey Chalfant said.

The boy’s father allegedly threatened a female friend at gunpoint when she tried to call 911 for help.  Prosecutors said he even stopped his own parents from getting help for the boy, who was having seizures and convulsing.

“An 8-year-old child more than likely suffered for many hours,” detective Tom Barker said.  “It upsets you.”

Investigators said the elder Collman’s previous record includes charges for trafficking and sexual misconduct with a minor.  He was also arrested by police once for a high-speed chase.

The suspect is seeking to have his bond reduced to await trial at home.  Prosecutors say they’re going to fight to keep him behind bars.