PA Your Agenda Will Not Benefit Children

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Make A Difference

Open the Statute Of Limitations for EVERYONE that has Sexually Abused a Child

Let Justice be served EQUALLY, or Stop Persecuting Clergy and ruining careers!!!!

Lawmakers in Pennsylvania asking for help for victims of
Child Abuse

Your agenda shows right through the illusion of helping Children, because BS DOES NOT smell like anything associated with Children, more like CRONYS and GOOD OL’ BOYS….

“I honestly believe just through the calls and emails that I’ve received that we start looking at other diocese,” Rozzi said.

When people start throwing The Clergy under the bus, it always turns out they got something to hide.

As it turns out, I recall quiet a list of things just for the past 2 years  that Pennsylvania would love to hide:

  • Pennsylvania ignoring Sex Offenders and Child Sexual Abuse in their own school systems.
  • Attorney Questions Changed PA Child Abuse Report.
  • PA DHS 3rd Revised 2014 CA Report.
  • Sexual Abuse Suspects Sentenced to 880 Years in Prison.

I believe it needs to be mentioned FOR THE RECORD, that reports of Child Sexual Abuse is UNSUBSTANTIATED only less than 2% of the time, while reports against The Clergy is UNSUBSTANTIATED over 65% of the time, and it must be mentioned FOR THE RECORD, that Law Enforcement conducts all investigations.  Which is, as it should be since Our Officers of the Law are properly trained and best know the Laws.

Reports of child abuse swamp police under updated Pennsylvania law

Pennsylvania’s ChildLine received 62 percent more reports of abuse and neglect in 2015 than it did the year prior to adoption of the Safe Kids Act.

Almost all of the increase was driven by the state’s addition of an online system for reporting abuse.  Prior to last year, phone service to call in abuse was ChildLine’s only component.

PLEASE PENNSYLVANIA, DO NOT LET THESE PEOPLE WITH A BAD AGENDA DETRACT FROM ALL THE GOOD YOU HAVE DONE THIS PAST YEAR WITH THE SAFE KIDS ACT AND LAW ENFORCEMENT BEING IN THE CHILD ABUSE CALL LOOP.  

 

 

PA Man Guilty Of 2nd Child Endangerment

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Toddler was physically Abused by Father

Bedford County man a repeat offender of Child Abuse

BEDFORD, Pennsylvania  –  For the second time in as many years, a Bedford County man has been found guilty of endangering the welfare of a child.

Cary Albright, 33, of Osterburg, was found guilty Thursday night after a day of testimony.

The most recent charges occurred after Memorial Day 2015 when Albright returned his 3-year-old son to the mother.

According to a release from the Bedford County District Bill Higgins, the mother discovered the child had been beaten.  The child had injuries that included large bruises on both sides of the face and red marks around his neck, with black and blue bruising around other areas.

The release said the child was told by his father to say that he had fallen, but later admitted that “his daddy did this to me.”

In 2012, police responded to a domestic violence incident in which Albright allegedly slammed the same child’s head into a wall while attempting to flee the scene.

Two years later, a jury convicted Albright of endangering the welfare of a child and resisting arrest.  He was sentenced to 11 months in jail.

Albright is scheduled to be sentenced on May 6 and will remain in jail on retainer until sentencing.

He remains in the Bedford County Jail on a parole violation detainer.

Complete Absence Of Any Supervision

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Deonte Carraway, 22

Serial Child Abuse Alleged at Maryland School

By ROSE BOUBOUSHIAN

UPPER MARLBORO, MD  (CN)  –  A Maryland elementary school choir director persuaded dozens of children to perform sexual acts on camera by telling them they were part of a “club,” a mother claims in a class action.

Jane Doe No. 2 sued the Prince George’s County Board of Education, elementary school principal Michelle Williams, and the alleged molester, teacher assistant Deonte Carraway, on Feb. 11 in Prince George’s County Court.

A second mother, Jane Doe. No. 1, filed a similar complaint, which was not a class action.

Carraway, 22, was arrested on Feb. 6 and charged with 10 counts of felony child pornography and sexual abuse.

He worked for the Judge Sylvania Woods Elementary School in Glenarden as a paid teacher’s assistant from November 2014 to September 2015, then as an unpaid volunteer, according to the complaints.

According to the class action, “On multiple occasions, Carraway coerced John Doe No. 2 to engage in sexual acts with him on school property during school hours.”

Carraway also made the boy “engage in sexual acts with him on multiple occasions at the Glenarden Municipal Center” at Friday night choir practice, the mother says.

Carraway scheduled meetings with and sent photos and videos to John Doe 2 through the smartphone app Kik, which allows people to send anonymous photos and messages, Doe’s mother says.

Carraway’s predations began in early 2015 went on until January this year, when another student’s uncle “discovered that Carraway had been communicating with his nephew and other children on Kik,” the complaint states.

“The student’s uncle saw that there were inappropriate pictures of students that were sent through Kik.”

The uncle notified principal Williams on Feb. 4 this year and called police that night, according to the complaint.  County police then found four SIM cards from Carraway’s cellphone.

“On just one of the SIM cards, there were at least 44 recordings of sexual acts involving children,” the complaint states.

It continues: “Upon information and belief, on some of the recordings, Carraway can be seen or heard directing the children to perform certain sexual acts.

“Upon information and belief, one of the recordings is of a child performing a sexual act on Carraway in a school bathroom while he recorded the act on his cellphone.

“The obscene recordings on Carraway’s phone range from 8-second clips to videos running over a minute.”

So brazen was Carraway that he would call students out of class and tell them they “would be participating in a ‘club’ with him to help persuade them to engage in these sexual acts on camera,” the complaint states.

His victims were as young as 9, and “the number of victims is at least 10, but it may be as many as 30,” according to the complaint.

Doe’s mom says that Carraway’s sexual abuse was “common knowledge among the students.”

She says that although parents and teachers “expressed concern” about Carraway’s “predatory behavior,” principal Williams took no action, claiming they had “no proof.”

Doe blames the “complete absence of any supervision and oversight of his conduct.”

Doe seeks class certification and damages for Title IX violations, other civil rights violations, violations of Maryland human rights law, negligent supervision, intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of privacy, and battery.

She is represented by Timothy Maloney with Joseph, Greenwald & Laake in Greenbelt, who represents Jane Doe No. 1 in her lawsuit against the same defendants.

Attorney Maloney said the criminal and civil cases are just beginning.

“The shocking events at Sylvania Woods Elementary revealed a profound breach of trust,” Maloney said in an email Sunday.

Almost all of the nearly 700 students at Sylvania Woods are black and Latino and/or qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, according to The Washington Post.

Authorities have identified 17 victims so far, 9 to 13 years old, according to the Post.

Principal Williams is on paid leave, and Carraway is being held on a $1 million bond.

It is far from unusual in complaints such as this for parents to claim that school administrators knew of or had reason to know of a teacher’s abuse, but failed to take action.

“Ruining someone’s career can be actionable,” one attorney with knowledge of such cases told Courthouse News.  “Failing to ruin someone’s career is less actionable.”

CPS Not Above The Law In Kentucky

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Memorial to Amy Dye at Todd County elementary school.

Court slaps Ky for $1M over Child Abuse
records

Finding the public has a right to know about child-abuse deaths and serious injuries, a state Appeals Court panel has issued a forceful ruling in a case brought by the state’s two largest newspapers.

In a major rebuke to state officials who fought to withhold such records, the Appeals Court ruled the Cabinet for Health and Family Services must pay legal costs and penalties of nearly $1 million to The Courier-Journal and Lexington Herald-Leader.

Calling the cabinet’s conduct “egregious,” Appeals Court Judge Irv Maze, who wrote the opinion for the panel, said the case reveals “the culture of secrecy” at the cabinet and “its misguided belief that the Open Records Act is merely an ideal, a suggestion to be taken when it is convenient and flagrantly disregarded when it is not.”

“It’s a terrific ruling, just terrific,” said Jon Fleischaker, who represented The Courier-Journal in the case.  “We hope this puts an end to it.”

The administration of Gov. Matt Bevin on Friday blamed the outcome on his predecessor, Steve Beshear, whose officials denied access to the records in the case that dates back to 2010.

“The court’s opinion is based on a serious coverup during the Beshear administration that has now led to an unfortunate million-dollar liability for the commonwealth’s taxpayers,” Bevin spokeswoman Jessica Ditto said.  “In the Bevin administration, things will be very different – we will hold ourselves accountable and be accessible to the public, particularly regarding the most vulnerable members of society.”

In his opinion, Maze cited the cabinet’s “systematic and categorical disregard for the rule of law” as grounds for upholding penalties of $756,000 against it for refusing to follow the open records law or previous court orders of the trial judge in the case, Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd.

The panel also included Judges Jeff Taylor and Janet Stumbo.
Shepherd had sharply criticized the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services for withholding key records in several high-profile child abuse cases in which it had been involved.

One involved the 2011 death of Amy Dye, 9, who was beaten to death in her adoptive home in Todd County.  The other involved the 2009 death of Wayne County toddler Kayden Branham, who died after drinking drain cleaner from a meth lab in a trailer where the child’s teenage parents were staying.

Shepherd at one point found the cabinet “intentionally adopted a legal strategy designated to delay, obstruct and circumvent the court’s ruling,” a finding cited by Maze in his opinion.

Friday’s Appeals Court ruling comes after a legal battle of nearly six years by the newspapers over access to the cabinet’s records in such cases.

It also comes after a similar ruling in December by the same Appeals Court panel, upholding an award of $16,625 in legal costs to the Todd County Standard in a separate case where that newspaper had sought records related to the Amy Dye death.

In that case, the cabinet first ignored the records request from the weekly newspaper in Western Kentucky, then denied having any such records before eventually producing them at the order of Shepherd, who released them.

In the case decided Friday, The Courier-Journal and Herald-Leader had requested two years worth of records of child-abuse death and injuries, totally about 140 cases.

The cabinet initially refused to release any of the records, citing confidentiality.  After a series of rulings by Shepherd in favor of disclosure, it began releasing some heavily redacted material. It eventually began disclosing nearly all material requested by the newspapers.

While the cabinet’s investigations of child-abuse and neglect cases are confidential, federal and state law make an exception when the abuse or neglect results in a death or life-threatening injury to a child.
The Appeals Court did not rule directly on the issue of the cabinet’s duty to release the records, finding the issue to be moot because the cabinet already has begun providing such records upon request, acting on Shepherd’s orders.

But the cabinet also challenged the newspapers’ legal fees of about $300,000 as well as $765,000 in fines.

Taylor concurred with the overall finding but dissented over whether the cabinet should pay the fines as imposed by Shepherd.

Under open records law, an agency may be fined up to $25 per day for every day it “willfully” withholds a public record.

Shepherd, finding that the cabinet had willfully withheld 140 cases, fined it $10 a day for the 540 days he calculated the cabinet had wrongly withheld records from the newspaper for the total of $765,000.

But Taylor, in his dissent, argued the fines should have been calculated by the number of persons requesting them – in this case, the two newspapers – rather than by all 140 cases, which would have resulted in a much lower fine.

The case now returns to Franklin Circuit Court for Shepherd to rule on the issue of the fines and legal fees.

TX Special Needs Child Waterboarded

Kaufman County couple accused of waterboarding, tying rope around boy’s genitals

A Kaufman County couple is accused of torturing a boy with special needs as punishment.

Police said Christi Howell and her boyfriend Casey Shackleford held the boy down, placed a towel over his face and poured water over it – essentially waterboarding the boy.

A Kaufman County investigator said Howell is a relative of the boy and that she admitted she poured water over him, but said it was Shackleford’s idea.

According to the affidavit, they also tied a rope around the boy’s genitals and neck — kicking and beating him while they forced him to do push-ups.  The boy’s exact age was not released by officials.

Howell was being held on a $250,000 dollar bond for injury to a child.  Police have issued an arrest warrant for Shackleford.

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