Tag Archives: Child Predator

Not Funday For TX Teacher

.jpg photo of men accused of Soliciting a Child
Jarrod Cook, 29,(Top Left) teaches science at North Crowley High School.

Ft Worth Teacher Busted In OnlIne
Predator Sting

FT WORTH, TX   –  A Fort Worth high school teacher was arrested on suspicion of online solicitation of a minor after a sting operation caught the 29-year-old man trying to meet with a person he believed to be a teenage girl for sex, police said.  Six other men also were arrested.

Jarrod Cook, who teaches science at North Crowley High School, has been placed on administrative leave pending the result of an investigation, the district said.  He was hired in August 2016.

.jpg photo of men accused of Soliciting a Child
Men accused of On-Line Solicitation of a Child.

The sting involved investigators posing as girls and boys ages 13 to 15, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.  The seven suspects went to an agreed location to have sexual contact with a person they believed to be a teenage girl.

Cook responded to a post on the Whisper app titled “Sunday funday?” that he thought was a 15-year-old girl.  Cook told the poster,” “I think it’s kinda hot that you’re young and inexperienced,” according to an arrest affidavit obtained by the newspaper.

Cook continued to communicate with the “girl” in a sexual nature, including sending a photo of himself and a photo of a penis before asking to meet with her, the affidavit said.

Six others arrested were Douglas Hammonds, 63; Gary Gibson, 55; Donny Stringer, 59; James Marshall, 26; Zachary Blakley, 20; and Geronimo Farias, 32.

Arlington police, the Tarrant County sheriff’s office, Texas Department of Public Safety Criminal Investigations Division in Hurst and the Department of Homeland Security Investigations assisted Fort Worth police in the sting.

Child Predator Caught In Irving

.jpg photo of Child Predator
Kenneth Dewayne Roblez, 38, who made lewd comments to young girls in Grapevine and Plano has been arrested.

Grapevine Child Predator In Custody

GRAPEVINE, TX  – The search for a man who is being called a child predator in North Texas is over.

“When WE THE PEOPLE are told, ‘The Search Is Over’, does this mean it’s over AGAIN until the next time, or does this mean that it is FINALLY OVER, and this Sewer Rat will never have the chance, much less the opportunity to traumatize another Child, nor Parent, ever again????”
Robert StrongBow

Police say the man who made lewd comments to young girls in Grapevine and Plano has been arrested.

Kenneth Dewayne Roblez, 38, was taken into custody in the 3500 block of North Belt Line Road on Friday afternoon, Grapevine Police say.

#BreakingNews SUSPECT #ARRESTED Registered sex offender Kenneth Roblez is now in custody – arrested in Irving. pic.twitter.com/QNnSKfj3v9
— Grapevine Police (@GrapevinePolice) October 6, 2017

Before the lunch hour on Friday, police in Plano released a short video of a man they were looking for.  Officials with the Plano Police Department told a CBS 11 News crew that the person was spotted three times in their city, with two incidents being reported to authorities.

It is now also believed that the suspect in Plano is Roblez, who was involved in several disturbing incidents that occurred in Grapevine.

It was on September 23 when police in Plano received a report of a man making lewd comments at a Walmart store.  One day later, there was another report about a man lifting up the skirt of an 11-year-old girl at a Target store.  On September 30, the same man was seen at another Target store in Plano, but there were no criminal reports made.

Please share this surveillance video of a suspect inside Target who made lewd comments involving children.  If you know him call 817.410.8127 pic.twitter.com/1GiC2MNHGN
— Grapevine Police (@GrapevinePolice) October 4, 2017

Meanwhile, police conducting a separate investigation in Grapevine released photos and surveillance video of Roblez.  They believe the 38-year-old sex offender is the person who made lewd comments to a 9-year-old girl and made sexually suggestive comments to a mother about her 11-year-old.

Got 2B Safe – My Rules

.jpg photo of NCMEC Logo
Join with us in donating to this worthy cause.

Knowing My Rules for Safety

  1. I CHECK FIRST with my parents, guardians, or other trusted adults before going anywhere, helping anyone, accepting anything, or getting into a car.
  2. I TAKE A FRIEND with me when going places or playing outside.
  3. I TELL people “NO” if they try to touch me or hurt me. It’s OK
    for me to stand up for myself.
  4. I TELL my trusted adult if anything makes me feel sad, scared,
    or confused.

Sometimes there are people who trick or hurt others.  No one has the right to do that to you.  So use these rules, and remember you are STRONG, are SMART, and have the right to be SAFE.

Always:

  • CHECK FIRST
  • TAKE A FRIEND
  • TELL PEOPLE “NO” IF THEY TRY TO TOUCH YOU OR HURT YOU
  • TELL AN ADULT YOU TRUST IF ANYTHING HAPPENS

1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678)
www.missingkids.com

KidSmartz is a child safety program that educates families about preventing abduction and empowers kids in grades K-5 to practice safer behaviors.  This program offers resources to help parents, caregivers, and teachers protect kids by teaching and practicing the 4 Rules of Personal Safety using tips, printable activities, quizzes, articles, music, videos, and more.

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®
CyberTipline

Resources:

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®

KidSmartz.org

Keep Your Children Safe

.jpg photo of NCMEC Logo
Child Safety is more than a slogan

CHILD SAFETY IS MORE THAN A SLOGAN

“Stranger-Danger” Warnings Not Effective at Keeping Kids Safer

By Nancy A. McBride, National Safety Director
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®
www.missingkids.com

Stranger danger” — the phrase is so pervasive in our culture it has become part of the lexicon.  The media and other professionals often use this phrase as a slogan to try to educate children about how to avoid dangerous situations and individuals.  When well-intentioned professionals and parents/guardians use the phrase “stranger danger” it may mistakenly convey only strangers harm children.  The message of “never talk to strangers” does not fully educate children about how to stay safer.

What does “stranger danger” really mean, and do children benefit from an outdated and misleading message?

Here’s what we have learned about the “stranger-danger” concept.

  • Children don’t get it
  • Adults don’t practice it
  • Children need to know how to recognize and avoid potentially dangerous situations
  • Adults need to know risks to children are greater from someone they know

This is why the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) does not support the “strangerdanger” message.  The majority of cases have shown most children are not taken by a stranger, but rather are abducted by someone they know.

When questioned, children will often describe a “stranger” as someone who is “ugly or mean.”  They do not perceive attractive or friendly people as “strangers.”  If someone talks to a child or is even around a child more than once, that person may lose his or her “stranger” status to the child.  The child may then think he or she
“knows” that person.  Children also want to be helpful, thrive on adult approval, and respond to adult authority.

So if someone with ill intent asks a child to perform a task or tells a child something has happened to a loved one, there is a good chance the child may be tricked into going with that person.

The “stranger-danger” message becomes even more confusing for children because they may not be able to tell by looking at someone whether that individual is “good” or “bad.”  Wouldn’t it be great if we could simply recognize and point out the “bad” people to our children?  Adults often break the rule of “don’t talk to strangers”
in a number of different situations.  Adults, however, have the benefit of experience, judgment, and decision making skills.  Children do not.  And even adults, at times, may misperceive potential dangers.  So if we are not always able to identify “bad” people, we certainly cannot expect our children to be able to do so.

Children need to be empowered with positive messages and safety skills that will not only build their self-esteem and self-confidence but also help keep them safer. Children need to learn how to recognize and avoid potentially dangerous situations.  If they become involved in a dangerous situation, children need to learn
effective steps they can take to remove themselves from the situation.  Children do not need to be told the world is a scary place. They see it through a variety of media, hear it from adults, or may even personally experience violence.  Children need to know their parents, guardians, or other trusted adults — people whom the parents/guardians have come to rely on and with whom they and their children feel comfortable — are there for them if they are in trouble.  Children also need to know the majority of adults in their lives are good people.

When we tell children to “never talk to strangers,” we have effectively eliminated a key source of help for them.  If they are lost they may be surrounded by many rescuers who could help them.   If children perceive these people as “strangers,” they may not speak or reach out to them.  There have been cases in which a child’s rescue was delayed because the lost child was afraid to call out to the “strangers” when rescuers were nearby.  Parents and guardians cannot be with their children every second of the day.  We need to give our children “safety nets,” the plans and people you’ve put in place to contact so your children know there is always someone available to help them.  These individuals may include uniformed law-enforcement or security officers and store/business personnel wearing nametags.

The safety messages need to be tailored to specific circumstances, such as being lost outside.  Parents and guardians should teach children to:

  • Stay put and not wander away from where they first became lost. Staying where they are increases children’s chances of being found unless that place becomes too dangerous because of severe weather or another potentially threatening situation.  In that case children need to go to the nearest safe spot and wait for rescuers.
  • Make noise either by yelling, blowing a whistle, or attracting attention in some other way.  This may help bring someone to their rescue.

Parents and guardians should make child safety part of a child’s everyday life in a reassuring way by practicing these skills.  Whether it is checking first with a trusted adult, taking a friend, or avoiding and getting out of potentially dangerous situations, there are easy “what-if” scenarios you may practice with your children to make sure they understand and “get it.”  Make outings to a mall or the park a “teachable moment” to make sure your children understand the safety messages and are able to use them in real-life situations.

Children will begin to learn what to do if they become lost or are in danger by practicing these “what-if” scenarios with you on a regular basis.  You can also use these opportunities to reassure your children you are there for them, and remind them there are other people who also are able to help them.

NCMEC believes it is time for everyone to retire use of the “stranger-danger” message.  By realizing child safety
is much more than a slogan, we can then arm our children with relevant, age-appropriate messages to help empower and protect them from potentially dangerous situations.  Having strong parental, guardian, and caregiver supervision and attention is vital to keeping our children safer.

For more information about child-safety topics, visit our website at www.missingkids.com or contact us at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678).

Copyright © 2005, 2010, and 2011 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. All rights reserved.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2011-MC-CX-K001 awarded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of JusticeNational Center for Missing & Exploited Children® and 1-800-THE-LOST® are registered trademarks of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.  NCMEC Order PDF-10A.

NOTE: This is not the property of NOT IN MY WORLD!!!!, we are a self-supporting information center for parents, families, and the public, to help all children, who are the future of our world; by raising awareness to Child Abuse, and it’s lifelong detrimental effects.

We want to say THANK YOU to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, and the U.S. Department of Justice for allowing us the use of so many resources to properly educate our staff, and also to pass along this valuable information and resources to Parents, Family, and the public.

AZ Nurse, CA Nurse, Neurosurgeon Facing Multiple CSA Charges

.jpg photo of nurse accused of Child Sex Abuse
Emily Joy Stephens, 30

Tucson woman faces additional Child
Sex Abuse charges in California

A Tucson woman arrested in May on child sex abuse charges out of California is facing additional charges in connection with the crime.

Emily Joy Stephens, 30, was previously facing six felony child-abuse charges involving three children under the age of 10 and three children under the age of 14 in Santa Cruz County Superior Court.

On August 4, she was charged with two additional counts of oral copulation or penetration on a child under 10, according to Santa Cruz County Superior Court records.

Stephens is being held without bond in Pima County jail awaiting extradition to California.

Also accused in the case is California neurosurgeon James Kohut, 57, who is facing multiple counts of sexually abusing children younger than 14.

On May 11, a police detective from Watsonville, California contacted the Pima County Sheriff’s Department regarding a video that showed Stephens and another woman having sex with three juveniles, according to Arizona Daily Star archives.

The other woman, Rashel Brandon, is a 42-year-old nurse who worked with Kohut in a Santa Cruz hospital.  She’s also facing multiple charges of child sexual abuse in connection with the case, according to the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

When deputies arrested Stephens, she was living with her five children, all whom are under the age of 13, according to sheriff’s department records.

Stephens, who is pregnant with Kohut’s child, met Kohut eight years ago on a website for single parents, according to Star archives.