Tag Archives: Children

Hub City TX Is Going Blue For Children

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The Go Blue Lubbock campaign, held every April as a part of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, stresses the importance of protecting children and preventing child abuse on the South Plains.

Go Blue Lubbock promotes Child Abuse
prevention

Posted Apr 3, 2020

LUBBOCK, TX  –  Amid new concerns about child abuse, the Go Blue Lubbock campaign, held every April as a part of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, stresses the importance of protecting children and preventing child abuse on the South Plains.

With added pressures brought on by health concerns, job insecurity, financial strain, and other effects of the coronavirus crisis, children are at greater risk as parents and caregivers struggle to cope.

In 2019, there were 3,095 confirmed cases of child abuse in the Lubbock Region.

Fifteen children lost their lives in abuse or neglect related fatalities in this area.

The Lubbock area continues to have one of the highest rates of confirmed abuse or neglect in the state with an average of three confirmed cases in Lubbock County every day.

The public is invited to participate in the campaign by wearing blue on Go Blue Fridays throughout the month of April and sharing and tagging with the hashtag #GoBlueLubbock.

More information is available on United Way’s website at liveunitedlubbock.org/gobluelubbock.

It’s Not Just Fb Or Google

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Is your family really safe? Do you really know who has your family’s information and is watching them?

The antivirus product of the year is really
a surveillance tool…

All I can say is… wouldn’t you know it.

Avast was named AV-Comparatives’ 2018 Product of the Year.  It offers premium security for mobile devices, laptops, and home computers.  And it can be downloaded for free.  What’s not to like?

Consumers certainly love the idea of free antivirus protection.  Avast now has more than 435 million active users a month.  That’s a huge customer base.

But it turns out there is a catch…

Avast has a subsidiary called Jumpshot.  And Jumpshot has been harvesting the data of every Avast user from the moment they installed the software.

Every search.  Every click.  Every buy.  On every site.  Jumpshot recorded it all, packaged it up, and sold it.

And guess who the buyers have been?  Google, Microsoft, McKinsey, Pepsi, Home Depot, and others.

These are large, blue-chip companies.  And reportedly some of them have been paying millions of dollars to get their hands on the data Jumpshot has taken.  Some of this data is very sensitive and personal.

This is perhaps even more invasive than what Google and Facebook are doing.  It’s scary.

And we were never supposed to know about it.  Jumpshot required its customers to sign very strict confidentiality agreements.  Thankfully, Motherboard and PC Magazine launched a joint investigation and discovered what was really going on.

So the big takeaway here is simple.  Nothing is ever free.  If a product or service is marketed as free, that means we are the product.

Somewhere, buried within an agreement, consumers unwittingly “consent” to allow these free products and services to spy on them and do whatever they want with the information obtained.

While some companies may call that consent, I call it deception and a violation of our privacy.  And I highly recommend readers stay away from Avast… and stay skeptical of any other product that is supposedly “free.”

Children Are In Danger On-Line

Cyber Safety

The proliferation of child predators using the Internet to target young victims has become a national crisis.  A study shows one in seven children will be solicited for sex online in the next year.

The Texas Attorney General is urging all parents and teachers to realize the risks our children face online, and take steps to help ensure their children’s safety.

Internet Chase Video

So why are some teens so trusting of people they meet online?  For many students there is a sense that what happens online can’t hurt them.  Unfortunately, we are finding that many teens are posting personal information in chat rooms and on social networking sites making them easy prey for child predators.

In this video, provided from the I-Safe curriculum, you can see what happens when one student finds out the hard way that you can’t trust what people tell you online. Click the image to watch the video.

If for any reason you fear any one, or have any doubts about your safety, contact Law Enforcement immediately.

Texas Attorney General’s office 1 (800) 252-8011

The CyberTipline
https://report.cybertip.org/
1-800-843-5678

Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website
http://www.nsopw.gov

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®
http://www.missingkids.com

TX Cares About Children And Families

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Some child abuse pediatricians have implicated parents who appear to have credible claims of innocence, an investigation by NBC News and the Houston Chronicle found.

Texas lawmakers want to protect families wrongly accused of Child Abuse

In response to an NBC News investigation, lawmakers want families to be allowed a second medical opinion before a child is taken from a home.

HOUSTON, TX  –  Texas lawmakers are calling for stronger safeguards in the state’s child welfare system after an NBC News and Houston Chronicle investigation found children had been taken from their parents based on disputed medical opinions from doctors trained to spot child abuse.

The reporting showed that child welfare workers removed some children from homes after receiving reports from state-funded child abuse pediatricians that were later called into question, leading to traumatic family separations and months-long legal fights.

Rep. James Frank, chairman of the Texas House of Representatives committee that oversees the state’s Department of Family and Protective Services, said the investigation exposed serious problems.

“I’m very concerned with the premature, unnecessary removal of children, and I think it happens a lot more than people in Texas understand,” said Frank, a Republican from northern Texas.

Frank said he plans to call for a series of legislative hearings in the coming months to explore potential improvements.  Some legislators have suggested creating a way for courts, child welfare workers or accused families to request a second medical opinion before the state removes a child from a home.

Texas provides $5 million in grants each year — including $2.5 million from the agency that oversees Child Protective Services — to support the work of child abuse pediatricians, a small but growing subspecialty of doctors who examine children who come into hospitals with suspicious injuries.  The Texas grants deputize some of the doctors to review cases on behalf of child welfare investigators, who then rely on their reports when deciding whether to remove children from parents.

Frank acknowledged that these state-supported physicians have a difficult job and that they play a critical role in protecting abused children, likely saving lives.  But he said he’s heard from numerous parents in recent years whose children were removed by Child Protective Services based primarily on a report from a child abuse pediatrician and despite contradictory opinions from other doctors.

In those cases, Frank said he thinks child welfare workers are sometimes too deferential to agency-funded abuse doctors and fail to complete a thorough investigation before taking children.

“In most cases, the doctors aren’t saying ‘This is child abuse,’” Frank said.  “They’re saying that they are concerned that it’s child abuse.  And so I don’t know there are enough checks and balances to make sure that we have confirmed that it really is child abuse.”

Rep. Harold Dutton Jr., a Houston Democrat and lawyer who has represented a mother who says she was wrongly accused by a child abuse pediatrician, said he has begun discussions with Frank to figure out potential improvements.

“We haven’t come up with anything yet, but we’re working towards it,” he said.  “One of the things that needs to happen is we need to better define when CPS should remove children.  We’ve got to do a better job of that.”

In a statement, Patrick Crimmins, a spokesman for the Department of Family and Protective Services, said the agency relies on the expertise of child abuse pediatricians when its caseworkers and other medical specialists are unable to determine if a serious injury is a result of abuse.

“We believe this process has worked well to detect abuse in complex cases and has protected children,” Crimmins said.  “But any process — particularly one with the lives of children and their families at stake — can be improved, and we want to work with legislators and stakeholders to do just that.”

In interviews, leading child abuse pediatricians said they are careful to rule out underlying medical conditions and accidental causes before issuing their opinions. The doctors acknowledged that a mistaken child abuse diagnosis can result in a child being taken from caring parents.  But overlooking warning signs, they said, could lead to a child being left in a dangerous home, with potentially fatal consequences.

To state Rep. Gene Wu, the issues raised by the NBC News and Chronicle reporting were familiar.  Wu, a Houston Democrat and lawyer, sometimes handles cases involving Child Protective Services and allegations of abuse.

“I have personally dealt with a couple of cases … where you had day-to-day physicians who said, ‘This is a typical type of bone break that is common in children of this age because they’re learning to walk,’” Wu said.  “Then the case gets looked at by the child abuse expert and they say it might be child abuse, and then everyone sort of freaks out.”

In those instances, Wu said, “CPS is sort of caught in this damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t situation.”

Child abuse pediatricians are trained not only to identify abuse, but to identify medical conditions that can mimic abuse.  The doctors say they rule out or fail to confirm abuse more times than not.

But Wu said when medical specialists are focused on finding and preventing child abuse, it’s natural that some run-of-the-mill injuries may appear more sinister.

“If you’re a hammer, then everything is a nail,” Wu said.

In many cases, the only doctor consulted by Child Protective Services and called to testify in court is the child abuse expert who initially flagged the concerns, in part because many families do not have the money to hire seasoned lawyers or outside medical experts.

To address that, Frank and other lawmakers have suggested requiring Child Protective Services to seek additional medical opinions in some instances before removing children.  Another fix, Wu said, might be to create a mechanism for courts across the state to bring in independent experts to evaluate medically complex cases and offer a second opinion.

“We could create a pot of money that courts could dip into,” he said.  “One party could make a motion to the judge to request an independent expert, and the state could have a list of medical experts to take a look at it.”

There are no “easy solutions,” he cautioned.

“I’ve described the CPS system as a very finely balanced seesaw,” Wu said, “and if you tip it too much you’re going to take kids away from good parents, and if you tip it the other way, you’re going to have dead kids. …  Whatever we do, we need to make sure that this policy solution doesn’t tip the balance.

Jury Clears NE Woman Of Child Abuse

.jpg photo of York County NE courthouse where jury finds woman not guilty of child abuse
York County Courthouse Nebraska, where Ashley A. Eckard, 29, was found not guilty of Child Abuse.

Jury finds McCool woman not guilty
of Child Abuse

YORK, NE  –  A York County jury has found a McCool Junction woman not guilty of child abuse.

Ashley A. Eckard, 29, was charged with committing child abuse intentionally/no injury, a Class 3A felony.

Now that she has been found not guilty, the charge has been dismissed.

According to court documents, it was alleged that she burned an 8-year-old child on the hand with a lit cigarette.

According to the affidavit filed with the court, the child told investigators with Health and Human Services and the York County Sheriff’s Department that Eckard intentionally burned her three times.

The child said when she told Eckard she was going to tell other adults what happened, Eckard allegedly grabbed her by the ear and instructed her to say she had gotten hurt sliding down a slide on a bouncy house – according to the court documents.

The sheriff’s department’s investigator said he observed three burns on the child’s hand that were approximately the same size as a cigarette, in his reporting for the affidavit.

The jury was convened, a trial was held and the jury came back with the verdict of not guilty.