Tag Archives: Law Enforcement

PA Your Agenda Will Not Benefit Children

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Make A Difference

Open the Statute Of Limitations for EVERYONE that has Sexually Abused a Child

Let Justice be served EQUALLY, or Stop Persecuting Clergy and ruining careers!!!!

Lawmakers in Pennsylvania asking for help for victims of
Child Abuse

Your agenda shows right through the illusion of helping Children, because BS DOES NOT smell like anything associated with Children, more like CRONYS and GOOD OL’ BOYS….

“I honestly believe just through the calls and emails that I’ve received that we start looking at other diocese,” Rozzi said.

When people start throwing The Clergy under the bus, it always turns out they got something to hide.

As it turns out, I recall quiet a list of things just for the past 2 years  that Pennsylvania would love to hide:

  • Pennsylvania ignoring Sex Offenders and Child Sexual Abuse in their own school systems.
  • Attorney Questions Changed PA Child Abuse Report.
  • PA DHS 3rd Revised 2014 CA Report.
  • Sexual Abuse Suspects Sentenced to 880 Years in Prison.

I believe it needs to be mentioned FOR THE RECORD, that reports of Child Sexual Abuse is UNSUBSTANTIATED only less than 2% of the time, while reports against The Clergy is UNSUBSTANTIATED over 65% of the time, and it must be mentioned FOR THE RECORD, that Law Enforcement conducts all investigations.  Which is, as it should be since Our Officers of the Law are properly trained and best know the Laws.

Reports of child abuse swamp police under updated Pennsylvania law

Pennsylvania’s ChildLine received 62 percent more reports of abuse and neglect in 2015 than it did the year prior to adoption of the Safe Kids Act.

Almost all of the increase was driven by the state’s addition of an online system for reporting abuse.  Prior to last year, phone service to call in abuse was ChildLine’s only component.

PLEASE PENNSYLVANIA, DO NOT LET THESE PEOPLE WITH A BAD AGENDA DETRACT FROM ALL THE GOOD YOU HAVE DONE THIS PAST YEAR WITH THE SAFE KIDS ACT AND LAW ENFORCEMENT BEING IN THE CHILD ABUSE CALL LOOP.  

 

 

Complete Absence Of Any Supervision

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Deonte Carraway, 22

Serial Child Abuse Alleged at Maryland School

By ROSE BOUBOUSHIAN

UPPER MARLBORO, MD  (CN)  –  A Maryland elementary school choir director persuaded dozens of children to perform sexual acts on camera by telling them they were part of a “club,” a mother claims in a class action.

Jane Doe No. 2 sued the Prince George’s County Board of Education, elementary school principal Michelle Williams, and the alleged molester, teacher assistant Deonte Carraway, on Feb. 11 in Prince George’s County Court.

A second mother, Jane Doe. No. 1, filed a similar complaint, which was not a class action.

Carraway, 22, was arrested on Feb. 6 and charged with 10 counts of felony child pornography and sexual abuse.

He worked for the Judge Sylvania Woods Elementary School in Glenarden as a paid teacher’s assistant from November 2014 to September 2015, then as an unpaid volunteer, according to the complaints.

According to the class action, “On multiple occasions, Carraway coerced John Doe No. 2 to engage in sexual acts with him on school property during school hours.”

Carraway also made the boy “engage in sexual acts with him on multiple occasions at the Glenarden Municipal Center” at Friday night choir practice, the mother says.

Carraway scheduled meetings with and sent photos and videos to John Doe 2 through the smartphone app Kik, which allows people to send anonymous photos and messages, Doe’s mother says.

Carraway’s predations began in early 2015 went on until January this year, when another student’s uncle “discovered that Carraway had been communicating with his nephew and other children on Kik,” the complaint states.

“The student’s uncle saw that there were inappropriate pictures of students that were sent through Kik.”

The uncle notified principal Williams on Feb. 4 this year and called police that night, according to the complaint.  County police then found four SIM cards from Carraway’s cellphone.

“On just one of the SIM cards, there were at least 44 recordings of sexual acts involving children,” the complaint states.

It continues: “Upon information and belief, on some of the recordings, Carraway can be seen or heard directing the children to perform certain sexual acts.

“Upon information and belief, one of the recordings is of a child performing a sexual act on Carraway in a school bathroom while he recorded the act on his cellphone.

“The obscene recordings on Carraway’s phone range from 8-second clips to videos running over a minute.”

So brazen was Carraway that he would call students out of class and tell them they “would be participating in a ‘club’ with him to help persuade them to engage in these sexual acts on camera,” the complaint states.

His victims were as young as 9, and “the number of victims is at least 10, but it may be as many as 30,” according to the complaint.

Doe’s mom says that Carraway’s sexual abuse was “common knowledge among the students.”

She says that although parents and teachers “expressed concern” about Carraway’s “predatory behavior,” principal Williams took no action, claiming they had “no proof.”

Doe blames the “complete absence of any supervision and oversight of his conduct.”

Doe seeks class certification and damages for Title IX violations, other civil rights violations, violations of Maryland human rights law, negligent supervision, intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of privacy, and battery.

She is represented by Timothy Maloney with Joseph, Greenwald & Laake in Greenbelt, who represents Jane Doe No. 1 in her lawsuit against the same defendants.

Attorney Maloney said the criminal and civil cases are just beginning.

“The shocking events at Sylvania Woods Elementary revealed a profound breach of trust,” Maloney said in an email Sunday.

Almost all of the nearly 700 students at Sylvania Woods are black and Latino and/or qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, according to The Washington Post.

Authorities have identified 17 victims so far, 9 to 13 years old, according to the Post.

Principal Williams is on paid leave, and Carraway is being held on a $1 million bond.

It is far from unusual in complaints such as this for parents to claim that school administrators knew of or had reason to know of a teacher’s abuse, but failed to take action.

“Ruining someone’s career can be actionable,” one attorney with knowledge of such cases told Courthouse News.  “Failing to ruin someone’s career is less actionable.”

CO Statewide Child Abuse Hotline

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Colorado Child Abuse Hotline

Calling it in: Statewide Child Abuse Hotline
meets Morgan County

How to call:

To report a suspected case of child abuse or neglect in Morgan County, call 1-844-CO-4-KIDS.  All information given out over the hotline is kept confidential.

To find out more about how to recognize the signs of abuse, go to www.childabuse.org or www.co4kids.org.

Morgan County, Colorado  –  Caregivers, law enforcement officers and others in Morgan County are still adjusting to Colorado’s new method for reporting child abuse.

This month is the one-year anniversary of the statewide child abuse and neglect hotline, 1-844-CO-4-KIDS.  The hotline was created by the Colorado Department of Human Services in an effort to give “mandatory reporters”—those who are required by law to report suspected child abuse—and others a single phone number to call whenever they’re concerned about a child, no matter where they are.

In 2015 the hotline received more than 26,000 calls statewide, but many people are still using the old, county-specific numbers, and Morgan County is no different.

Before 2015, people who suspected a case of child abuse would typically call the police or the Morgan County DHS directly.  The new hotline automatically links callers to the appropriate call-taker for their county.  In Morgan County, that’s usually someone in the DHS, who then notifies the police if necessary.

“There are goods and bads to it,” Fort Morgan police chief Darin Sagel said.

The hotline slightly delays police officers’ response time in emergencies, he said.  Sagel also worries that some severe cases aren’t being reported to the police, since individuals who call the hotline are “not always equipped to tell how extensive the abuse is.”

But Jacque Frenier, director of the Morgan County DHS, said the hotline can save callers time by directing them to the right local organization immediately.  It’s also helpful for those who don’t know which county the child lives in, or don’t speak English, she said.

“Initially, there were some hiccups,” she said.  “But they’ve got most of them fixed now… the county’s mandatory reporters were used to calling us directly, but they’re getting used to it.”

The DHS has a few screeners whose job is to take calls about child abuse and determine the cases’ severity.   In about three cases out of four, they then pass it along to the police.  The only exceptions are cases which they determine require more assessment.

Many mandatory reporters, like teachers and medical workers, still call DHS or the police directly because those are the numbers they’re familiar with.  Altogether, Frenier estimated her organization gets about 50 calls a month reporting child abuse or neglect.

Above all, she said it’s important to gather as many details about the situation as possible before calling the hotline.  The more information DHS workers and law enforcement have, the faster they can respond.

“Many of us want to do the right thing, but some are unsure about first steps,” Robert Werthwein of the Colorado Department of Human Services said in a press release about the hotline.  “This hotline can, and in many instances, should be step one.”

Child Abuse That “Shocks The Soul”

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Mayra Solis and her friend, Fransisco Javier Rios-Covarrubias

Suspects arrested in Child Abuse case that “shocks the soul”

MESA, AZ  –  Two people have been arrested in connection to a severe child abuse case that police say “shocks the soul.”

The Mesa Police Department says a 3-year-old girl was found in a trash bag, covered in feces, duct-taped and hidden in a closet.  The girl’s mother, Mayra Solis and her friend, Fransisco Javier Rios-Covarrubias, have been arrested.

According to police, Solis would leave the girl with Covarrubias at his home while she was at work, and he would put the girl in a closet for hours, and possibly days at a time.  The child was found by police after a man, who Covarrubias met online, went to the suspect’s home and was offered the girl for sexual activities.

“@mesapd says mother of 3yo found bound in closet had shaved head of daughter to pander for money, claiming she had cancer.  Mom is homeless.” — Liz Kotalik (@LizKotalik) January 19, 2016

Police also say the girl’s head was shaved because Solis pandered her for money and claimed she had cancer.

Covarrubias has been charged with sex trafficking, kidnapping, sexual conduct with a minor and child abuse.  Solis is facing child abuse charges.

WISCONSIN ADOPTS “PARTS” OF CHILD ABUSE PACKAGE

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Wisconsin Law Makers adopt “PARTS” of Child Abuse package.

CORRUPT CPS STILL TRYING TO KEEP LAW ENFORCEMENT OUT OF THE LOOP

Madison, Wisconsin  –  The State Senate on Tuesday passed two bills backed by Attorney General Brad Schimel aimed at protecting child abuse victims.

One of the bills grants an advocate to victims of sexual assault, human trafficking or child abuse and another creates a new felony crime for engaging in repeated acts of child abuse.  Under current law, different acts of child abuse must be prosecuted separately.

The bills were introduced in October as part of a package that included two other bills that have drawn broader opposition, including a resolution opposing them by the Dane County Board.

Those bills, which broaden the definition of child neglect and expand reporting requirements to law enforcement for child abuse and neglect, passed committee on party lines, but have not been scheduled for a full Senate vote.  Opponents worry they will disproportionately affect low-income minorities and widen disparities in the criminal justice system.

Jason Mugnaini, an aide to Sen. Rob Cowles, who authored the bills, said the senator remains hopeful the other two will pass this session.