Tag Archives: NCMEC

Keep Your Children Safe

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Child Safety is more than a slogan

CHILD SAFETY IS MORE THAN A SLOGAN

“Stranger-Danger” Warnings Not Effective at Keeping Kids Safer

By Nancy A. McBride, National Safety Director
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®
www.missingkids.com

Stranger danger” — the phrase is so pervasive in our culture it has become part of the lexicon.  The media and other professionals often use this phrase as a slogan to try to educate children about how to avoid dangerous situations and individuals.  When well-intentioned professionals and parents/guardians use the phrase “stranger danger” it may mistakenly convey only strangers harm children.  The message of “never talk to strangers” does not fully educate children about how to stay safer.

What does “stranger danger” really mean, and do children benefit from an outdated and misleading message?

Here’s what we have learned about the “stranger-danger” concept.

  • Children don’t get it
  • Adults don’t practice it
  • Children need to know how to recognize and avoid potentially dangerous situations
  • Adults need to know risks to children are greater from someone they know

This is why the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) does not support the “strangerdanger” message.  The majority of cases have shown most children are not taken by a stranger, but rather are abducted by someone they know.

When questioned, children will often describe a “stranger” as someone who is “ugly or mean.”  They do not perceive attractive or friendly people as “strangers.”  If someone talks to a child or is even around a child more than once, that person may lose his or her “stranger” status to the child.  The child may then think he or she
“knows” that person.  Children also want to be helpful, thrive on adult approval, and respond to adult authority.

So if someone with ill intent asks a child to perform a task or tells a child something has happened to a loved one, there is a good chance the child may be tricked into going with that person.

The “stranger-danger” message becomes even more confusing for children because they may not be able to tell by looking at someone whether that individual is “good” or “bad.”  Wouldn’t it be great if we could simply recognize and point out the “bad” people to our children?  Adults often break the rule of “don’t talk to strangers”
in a number of different situations.  Adults, however, have the benefit of experience, judgment, and decision making skills.  Children do not.  And even adults, at times, may misperceive potential dangers.  So if we are not always able to identify “bad” people, we certainly cannot expect our children to be able to do so.

Children need to be empowered with positive messages and safety skills that will not only build their self-esteem and self-confidence but also help keep them safer. Children need to learn how to recognize and avoid potentially dangerous situations.  If they become involved in a dangerous situation, children need to learn
effective steps they can take to remove themselves from the situation.  Children do not need to be told the world is a scary place. They see it through a variety of media, hear it from adults, or may even personally experience violence.  Children need to know their parents, guardians, or other trusted adults — people whom the parents/guardians have come to rely on and with whom they and their children feel comfortable — are there for them if they are in trouble.  Children also need to know the majority of adults in their lives are good people.

When we tell children to “never talk to strangers,” we have effectively eliminated a key source of help for them.  If they are lost they may be surrounded by many rescuers who could help them.   If children perceive these people as “strangers,” they may not speak or reach out to them.  There have been cases in which a child’s rescue was delayed because the lost child was afraid to call out to the “strangers” when rescuers were nearby.  Parents and guardians cannot be with their children every second of the day.  We need to give our children “safety nets,” the plans and people you’ve put in place to contact so your children know there is always someone available to help them.  These individuals may include uniformed law-enforcement or security officers and store/business personnel wearing nametags.

The safety messages need to be tailored to specific circumstances, such as being lost outside.  Parents and guardians should teach children to:

  • Stay put and not wander away from where they first became lost. Staying where they are increases children’s chances of being found unless that place becomes too dangerous because of severe weather or another potentially threatening situation.  In that case children need to go to the nearest safe spot and wait for rescuers.
  • Make noise either by yelling, blowing a whistle, or attracting attention in some other way.  This may help bring someone to their rescue.

Parents and guardians should make child safety part of a child’s everyday life in a reassuring way by practicing these skills.  Whether it is checking first with a trusted adult, taking a friend, or avoiding and getting out of potentially dangerous situations, there are easy “what-if” scenarios you may practice with your children to make sure they understand and “get it.”  Make outings to a mall or the park a “teachable moment” to make sure your children understand the safety messages and are able to use them in real-life situations.

Children will begin to learn what to do if they become lost or are in danger by practicing these “what-if” scenarios with you on a regular basis.  You can also use these opportunities to reassure your children you are there for them, and remind them there are other people who also are able to help them.

NCMEC believes it is time for everyone to retire use of the “stranger-danger” message.  By realizing child safety
is much more than a slogan, we can then arm our children with relevant, age-appropriate messages to help empower and protect them from potentially dangerous situations.  Having strong parental, guardian, and caregiver supervision and attention is vital to keeping our children safer.

For more information about child-safety topics, visit our website at www.missingkids.com or contact us at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678).

Copyright © 2005, 2010, and 2011 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. All rights reserved.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2011-MC-CX-K001 awarded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of JusticeNational Center for Missing & Exploited Children® and 1-800-THE-LOST® are registered trademarks of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.  NCMEC Order PDF-10A.

NOTE: This is not the property of NOT IN MY WORLD!!!!, we are a self-supporting information center for parents, families, and the public, to help all children, who are the future of our world; by raising awareness to Child Abuse, and it’s lifelong detrimental effects.

We want to say THANK YOU to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, and the U.S. Department of Justice for allowing us the use of so many resources to properly educate our staff, and also to pass along this valuable information and resources to Parents, Family, and the public.

Son Of G. Gordon Liddy Charged With Child Porn

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NCMEC received a tip that Child Pornography had been up-loaded.

California State Prosecutor Charged With
Child Porn

A California deputy attorney general has been charged in San Diego with possession of child pornography.

Raymond Joseph Liddy was arrested Tuesday.  He pleaded not guilty and was released on $100,000 bond, according to a complaint.  The attorney general’s office said they are aware of the matter and that the 53-year-old Liddy was placed on administrative leave.

According to a complaint filed in federal court, an electronic service provider sent a tip to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in January that a user had uploaded an image that appeared to be child porn.

A month later another provider sent a similar tip to the San Diego Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.  The activity was traced to his home in Coronado, stated the complaint.

Liddy is accused of being in possession of about a dozen illegal photos.  He was put on home detention and is wearing an ankle device.

Local and federal authorities said they traced the activity to Liddy’s home.  When they questioned him, Liddy said he downloads sexual images and deletes them, according to the complaint.

He also said he may have forwarded some of the images, and some of them may have been of children, possibly.

They searched his home and uncovered disturbing photos on a computer and thumbdrive of minors engaged in sexual conduct.

Defense Attorney Knut Johnson, who has taken Liddy’s case, told NBC 7 that he knows his client is a good person and all his coworkers describe him as an honorable man.

TX Prison Guard Arrested For Child Porn Video

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Paulin Yagina Gatchoua, 27

Abilene correctional officer arrested after
Child Porn found on his Facebook page

ABILENE, TX  –  Abilene police arrested a correctional officer after child porn was found on his Facebook page.

Paulin Yagina Gatchoua, 27, is charged with possession of child porn and possession with intent to promote child porn.  He’s being held on $90,000 bond.

According to the search warrant obtained by KTXS, the National Center for Missing and Endangered Children contacted APD on June 1 after discovering a 52 second video on Gatchoua’s Facebook page.  It showed an infant female being sexually abused by an adult male.

Police executed a search warrant on Thursday at Gatchoua’s apartment on Nonesuch Road.  They seized cell phones, computers, storage devices and electronic files.

KTXS contacted TDCJ about Gatchoua’s arrest.  A spokesman said he was hired July 18, 2016 as a correctional officer at the Robertson Unit.

His employment is pending the outcome of the investigation.  Until then, he is not allowed on TDCJ property.

According to his Facebook page, Gatchoua went to school in Cameroon, Africa.  He says he also studied criminal justice at the University of Georgia.

You Are Your Child’s Best Resource

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The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®

When it comes to keeping your child safe,
YOU are their best resource.

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® knows children face risks every day.  That is why NCMEC provides resources to children, teachers, child care providers, parents and others to help keep children safer.  Please take a look at the resources below to learn more about how to keep your children safer.

KidSmartz

KidSmartz is NCMEC’s abduction prevention program that educates families about the 4 Rules of Safety and empowers kids in grades K-5 to make safer and smarter decisions.

NetSmartz® Workshop

Learn more about the Internet safety resources offered by the NetSmartz Workshop.  These interactive educational resources help prepare children to be safer online.

Safety Central

Safety Central is NCMEC’s child safety app, which includes a digital child ID and the latest news and safety tips from NCMEC.  The app even reminds you when it’s time to take a new photo of your child, which is one of the most important tools you would need if your child was missing.

If your child is missing

Learn what to do if your child is missing.  NCMEC recommends you immediately call your local law enforcement agency and then call NCMEC at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678).

Victim and family support

Learn more about the support services NCMEC provides to victims and families coping with the traumatic experiences of abduction and sexual exploitation.

It is because of you that we are able to do so much on behalf of the children who need us most.  Thank you for supporting the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®.  Together we are making a difference.

Sincerely,

Callahan Walsh
Child Advocate

Resources:

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®
http://www.missingkids.org

Got 2B Safe – My Rules – NCMEC

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Join with us in donating to this worthy cause

Knowing My Rules for Safety

1 – I CHECK FIRST with my parents, guardians, or other trusted adults before going anywhere, helping anyone, accepting anything, or getting into a car.

2 –  I TAKE A FRIEND with me when going places or playing outside.

3 –  I TELL people “NO” if they try to touch me or hurt me. It’s OK
for me to stand up for myself.

4 – I TELL my trusted adult if anything makes me feel sad, scared,
or confused.

Sometimes there are people who trick or hurt others.  No one has the right to do that to you.  So use these rules, and remember you are STRONG, are SMART, and have the right to be SAFE.
Always:

  • CHECK FIRST
  • TAKE A FRIEND
  • TELL PEOPLE “NO” IF THEY TRY TO TOUCH YOU OR HURT YOU
  • TELL AN ADULT YOU TRUST IF ANYTHING HAPPENS

KidSmartz is a child safety program that educates families about preventing abduction and empowers kids in grades K-5 to practice safer behaviors.  This program offers resources to help parents, caregivers, and teachers protect kids by teaching and practicing the 4 Rules of Personal Safety using tips, printable activities, quizzes, articles, music, videos, and more.

1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678)
http://www.missingkids.com

RESOURCES:

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

KidSmartz.org