Tag Archives: StopChildAbuse

Justice Served To Purveyors Of Child Porn In NY

Carthage Woman Sentenced to 90 Years for Child Pornography Production

Tammy Martin and Co-defendant Clif Seaway Filmed the Abuse of Three Child Victims

SYRACUSE, NY  –  Tammy M. Martin, age 48, of Carthage, New York, was sentenced today to serve 90 years in prison for her conviction on three counts of sexual exploitation of a child, announced United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith and Kevin M. Kelly, Special Agent in Charge of the Buffalo Field Office of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

The sentencing today follows Martin’s earlier plea of guilty during which she admitted that on at least 4 separate occasions in 2002, she and co-defendant Clif Seaway engaged the first of the 3 victims in sexually explicit conduct for the purpose of producing visual depictions.  This criminal conduct resulted in the production of at least 30 separate files depicting the child engaged in sexually explicit conduct.

Martin further admitted to the abuse of a second victim on at least 14 separate occasions from 2001 through 2007, producing at least 104 separate files depicting that abuse.

Finally, Martin admitted that on at least 26 occasions from 2004 through 2008, she and Seaway engaged the third of their victims in sexually explicit conduct, producing at least 211 separate files of that abuse.

Martin was sentenced to serve the maximum sentence allowable under federal law, consisting of 30 years of imprisonment on each count of conviction to be served consecutively to one another.  If Martin is ever released from prison, she is sentenced to a term of supervised release for life, and required to register as a sex offender.

“Over a seven year period, Tammy Martin and Clif Seaway sexually exploited three children, and the 90-year sentence imposed reflects the depravity and gravity of those crimes,” said United States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith.  “Our commitment to prosecutions to protect children and secure just punishment for their predators is unwavering, and we continue to seek sentences which ensure that those predators will never harm another child.”

“Today’s sentence clearly demonstrates the serious nature with which the law enforcement community views crimes committed against children,” said Kevin Kelly, Special Agent in charge of HSI Buffalo.  “HSI and our partners will continue to be relentless in the aggressive pursuit of these cases, and the significant prison term handed down is an appropriate one and should serve as a stark warning about the consequences awaiting those involved in these acts.”

For his part in the abuse of these and other children, Clif Seaway was sentenced on May 3, 2018 to serve 360 years in prison.

Martin’s case was investigated by the New York State Police, and the United States Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).  The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Lisa Fletcher, Project Safe Childhood Coordinator for the Northern District of New York, and Carina Schoenberger.

Launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice, Project Safe Childhood is led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS).  Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit https://www.justice.gov/psc

Child Abuse Or CA CPS Kidnap

.jpg photo of man arrested for child abuse
Jonathan Allen, 29

10 children taken from Fairfield home, Dad charged with torture

FAIRFIELD, CA  –  Fairfield police said they rescued ten children found living in squalor and arrested their parents.

Jonathan Allen, a father of eight of the children, was charged with seven counts of torture and nine counts of felony child abuse, by the Solano County District Attorney’s Office.  Police believe more charges could be filed as the investigation continues.

.jpg photo of woman arrested for child abuse
Ina Rogers, 30

Fairfield Police Department Lt. Greg Hurlbut said the children were living in unsafe living conditions.  Responding officers found spoiled food, as well as animal and human feces on the floor.  There was so much debris that some areas of the home were inaccessible, according to Hurlbut.

Investigators believe nine of the 10 children were abused.  In interviews the children described incidents of intentional abuse resulting in puncture wounds, burns, bruising and injuries consistent with being shot with a BB gun or pellet gun.

“I have not had a case where we charge someone with torture of their own children if that tells you something.  I’ve been in law enforcement since… well… more than 30 years ago,” said Hurlbut.

The Solano County District Attorney’s Office described this type of crime of torture as inflicting pain with the intent to cause cruel and extreme pain and suffering, and in this instance, for a sadistic purpose.

But the children’s mother said it’s all a big misunderstanding.

Officers responded to the home and discovered the apparent abuse when the children’s mother, Ina Rogers, called 911 on March 31.

Rogers told KTVU she called 911 after her 12-year-old son went for a walk and didn’t return home.  She said her son was upset when she took his iPad away because he didn’t do one of his chores.

Fairfield police located the boy asleep under a bush and returned him to the family home in the 2200 block of Fieldstone Court.  Officers said they conducted a search of the home due to concerns for the safety and health of the child and the child’s siblings.

During the search officers located nine more children, ranging in age from 4 months to 11-years-old.  Officers said the children were living in squalor and unsafe conditions.

Rogers said the home’s condition was a result of her “tearing up” the house because her son was missing.  “I was afraid that I could not find him.  Once that fear sets in, you don’t know what to do so in that moment,” she said.  “I tore up my house, I lifted up beds, I ripped things out of the closet, I completely tore up everything to make sure that he really wasn’t here.”

Rogers, a 30-year-old Fairfield resident, was arrested and booked into Solano County Jail for child neglect.  All ten children were taken into protective custody by Solano County Child Welfare Services.  According to Rogers, the children are now staying with family members.

Investigators from Child Welfare Services, Solano County District Attorney’s Office, Fairfield Police Department’s Family Violence Unit allege there has been a long and continuous history of severe physical and emotional abuse of the children.

Rogers denies any abuse, neglect or torture by her or her husband Jonathan Allen.  “I am 30-years-old and I have 11 children and also homeschool all of my children and people don’t agree with that lifestyle.  And so I’ve had many people question my right to parent and I feel this whole situation has exploded.”

Ina Rogers denies any abuse, neglect or torture by her or her husband Jonathan Allen.  @FairfieldPolice say 10 of her 11 kids were living in squalor & unsafe conditions.  The couple have 8 biological children together.  5,6p @KTVU pic.twitter.com/qQMwiWDar0— Henry K. Lee (@henrykleeKTVU) May 14, 2018

On May 11, detectives with the Fairfield Police Department arrested Jonathan Allen, a 29-year-old Fairfield resident.  He was booked into the Solano County Jail for nine counts of felony torture and six counts of felony child abuse. Eight of the ten children are Rogers’ and Allen’s biological children.  Rogers has 3 older children from a previous relationship.  Her oldest child, who is 14, does not live in the home and was not taken by Child Welfare Services.

“This is absolutely appalling to me.  I strive and I pride myself on being a good parent to my children,  My husband has a lot of tattoos.  He looks like a scary individual and that’s why people are so quick to judge him.  My husband is an amazing person and I am an amazing mother.  I am not going to allow this to break us and I am not going to stop fighting,” Rogers said.

Allen is due back in court May 24th.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to contact the Fairfield Police Department.

New Child Abuse Hotline In Santa Clara County CA

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New 24/7 Child Abuse Hotline In Santa Clara County CA

Santa Clara County Launches New
Child Abuse Hotline

Santa Clara County, CA officials declared April as National Child Abuse Prevention Month, timing the announcement with the launch of a new 24-hour hotline for people to report suspected child abuse.

What they failed to mention, however, is why the county needed a new hotline in the first place:  to fix a system that, until recently, was so woefully broken that it left an untold number of children in danger.

In 2013, the county’s Department of Family and Children’s Services (DFCS) came under fire for dropping up to half the calls some months to its child abuse hotline.  From July 2012 to the following year, call center operators answered an average of just 62 percent of calls.  Only a third of the 18 percent of calls that went to voicemail were ever returned.  About one in every five people hung up, frustrated by the hourlong holds.

It’s impossible to say how many valid abuse cases went unreported.

After San Jose Inside’s parent publication Metro Silicon Valley reported on the scathing 2013 audit, the county hired more call center employees and improve its hotline metrics.

“In years past … there was a problem with the phone being answered,” county Child Abuse Prevention Council Vice Chair Steve Baron said in an interview earlier this week.  “That problem has been largely rectified.”

Under new leadership, DFCS has since seen a considerable increase in the number of calls answered, Baron said.  People reported about 3.5 million child abuse cases each year in the U.S., about 58,000 in the Bay Area and more than 1,800 verified cases in this county alone.  In 2017, the county hotline logged some 30,000 calls—virtually of which were answered.

“They’re capturing and answering, I believe, over 98 percent of every call that comes in now,” he told San Jose Inside.  “Sometimes people just hang up or they change their mind so that accounts for the 2 percent.  But now there’s a human being answering the phone and they’re capturing those calls.”

Gilbert Murillo, who oversaw the child abuse reporting center during the time it was dropping half its calls, said the county had reduced wait times to 16 seconds by last year.

For people who would rather not speak to anyone, there’s also an option to go straight to voicemail—a feature included for the newly launched hotline as well.  And according to DFCS Director Francesca LeRúe, every single one of those voicemails gets returned.

The county’s newly announced hotline—833-SCC-KIDS (833-722-5437)—will field calls around the clock and will eventually replace the current system, which consists of multiple phone numbers.

“We have three different numbers in Santa Clara County, so it’s very confusing for people,” LeRúe said.  “We just thought it was important to streamline the process, to have one number, and then decided it was important that it should be, in fact, toll-free.”

Funding will remain unchanged with the new streamlined system, she said, and may eventually save money.

But those three existing hotline numbers will stay in place for another year to give the county time to inform people about the new one.

The first big push in promoting the hotline comes as part of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, LeRúe said.  The county encourages the community to wear blue on Friday to call attention to the cause, and to attend the 36th annual Child Abuse Prevention Council Symposium on April 27 in Campbell.

“There’s still a lot of awareness that needs to come to the community to let people know some facts about what child abuse is, what child neglect is,” LeRúe said.  “Everybody in Santa Clara County plays a big role in protecting children, it’s everybody’s responsibility.”

County social workers, executives and @SupCindyChavez raise awareness about protecting children from abuse. #ChildAbusePreventionMonth event highlights new toll-free number to Report Child Abuse in #SantaClaraCounty​. Call (833) SCC-KIDS (833-722-5437) 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week pic.twitter.com/uL4yzMArpr
— Santa Clara County (@SCCgov) April 4, 2018

KS Mother Arrested In TX

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Jamey Rae Schmidt, 31

Kansas woman arrested in Lampasas; charged with Child Abuse

LAMPASAS, TX  –  A woman from Wichita, Kansas, was arrested Wednesday afternoon in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Lampasas and was charged with continued abuse to her 13-year-old daughter, authorities say.

Lampasas police arrested Jamey Rae Schmidt, 31, after responding to reports of Schmidt abusing her daughter inside her family’s vehicle in the restaurant’s parking lot.  Schmidt faces a felony charge of injury to a child with bodily injury.

Lampasas Assistant Chief Jody Cummings said Schmidt’s husband, a 7 and 8-year-old and a dog were also inside the vehicle at the time.

Police identified evidence of a “fresh, minor” assault upon arrival, but further investigation determined the 13-year-old was a victim of prior assaults.

“We made an arrest for something we didn’t see, but determined it rose in seriousness from the evidence,” Cummings said.

Police did not say what motive was behind Schmidt’s alleged abuse.

Cummings said there were no reports of abuse to the 13-year-old’s siblings. The children were released with Schmidt’s husband.

Law Enforcement Seeing Rise In Reported Child Abuse

.jpg photo of Police Chief Avery Cook
It’s a problem that plagues every community, Child Abuse.

Bringing Awareness To Child Abuse

STARKVILLE, MS  –  It’s a problem that plagues every community, child abuse.

“A child is an innocent person and often times they really can’t be able to help themselves,” said West Point Police Chief Avery Cook.

Law enforcement said they’re seeing a rise in the number of reported child abuse cases.

Sally Kate Winters Family Services reports from 2016 to 2017, the organization saw a 73 percent increase in the number of child abuse interviews they conducted.

The abuse comes in different forms, and Sally Kate Winters is on the front-line in many of these investigations.

“Sally Kate Winters provides forensic interviews for child victims of abuse, so we do felony child abuse investigations and we interview kids who’ve been abused,” said Morgan Colley, Children’s Advocacy Center Advocate at Sally Kate Winters Family Services.

Now the organization is sharing its knowledge.

During a Child Abuse Investigation Training on Monday, law enforcement officers, child protective services, and first responders learned new techniques for spotting signs of mistreatment.

“We’re trying to help provide law enforcement with every tool that they need to investigate child abuse and child sexual crimes especially,” said Steven Woodruff, investigator for the district attorney’s office.  “We’re seeing an uptake in that in our community, and we don’t think that it’s just now starting to happen, we think that it’s just beginning to be reported more.”

“We’re doing two different presentations, one on corroborating evidence, so we have a child that discloses something and getting them to think about some of the minor details that a child might bring up in their testimony to make their story come alive,” said Jim Holler, who conducted Monday’s training session.  “This afternoon we’re doing one more investigative piece, especially physical abuse investigations and what the investigators can do to help the kids to help make their stories come alive.”

Holler is a former police chief with more than three decades of law enforcement experience.

He said the tools everyone learned during the training session are important and can help prosecutors be more effective.

“Just trying to put all the facts together and making sure that we’ve got the details, so we can bring a strong case to our prosecutors office, and hopefully that case will be strong enough to go proceed without a child having to testify,” said Holler.

Sally Kate Winters and the district attorney’s office co-sponsored the training session.