Category Archives: Better Laws

Nurses With AntiChild Agenda?

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Nurses with AntiChild Agenda?

Report claims NC hospital nurses refused to
report Child Sexual Abuse to DSS

MONROE, NC  –  A report obtained by CBS North Carolina’s Charlotte affiliate WBTV shows the nursing staff on duty at CMC-Union Hospital one night in November 2016 refused to call DSS after a child disclosed facts that implicated sexual abuse.

The report was filled out by James Jackson, who was working at the hospital as a security guard.

According to the report, the nurse in charge of caring for the young male patient refused to report the boy’s allegations of possible sexual abuse.

“I told his nurse about it and she said that she would not believe anything that he says because of his history at the hospital,” Jackson wrote in his report.

State law requires anyone aware of possible child abuse to report it to social services.

Jackson wrote in his report filed at the time of the incident that he called the nursing supervisor and, later, the charge nurse about reporting the boy’s allegations of sexual abuse but both of them declined to take action, too.

Ultimately, Jackson reported the boy’s allegations to Union County DSS himself and the agency opened an investigation into the claims.

“From what I can understand from being here, it’s not the first time this has happened,” Jackson said.  “But this is the time it happened with me on duty and I couldn’t let that go.  I couldn’t let it go that a child is being sexually abused like that and no one do anything about it.”

Jackson told WBTV that he tried to file a complaint with the North Carolina Board of Nursing but was told by a board staff member that it was having problems investigating his complaint because the hospital would not return phone calls.

Carolinas HealthCare System refused multiple requests for an interview but issued the following statement:

“Carolinas HealthCare System policy, in accordance with North Carolina statutes, requires that all cases of suspected child abuse or neglect be reported to Department of Social Services (DSS).  Calls to DSS are initiated by any CHS employee who identifies potential abuse or neglect.

We take all reports of abuse and neglect seriously and work closely with DSS and other governing authorities when the situation warrants.  Every day, our doctors, nurses and teammates care for vulnerable patients and advocate for children who are victims of abuse and neglect.  Elevating hope and advancing healing is not just part of our mission, it is integral to who we are as a healthcare system.”

While we cannot discuss the specifics of this case due to patient and employee privacy laws, we can say that after reviewing this issue, we do not believe the version of events represented accurately reflects what occurred.  We are dedicated to the health and well-being of all patients in our care and will continue to cooperate with the proper authorities and assist with any inquiries that may arise.”

A spokeswoman for the hospital did not provide any additional facts to support the assertion that Jackson’s account of what happened – as documented in his report filed at the time of the incident – was incorrect.  The hospital also did not elaborate on what, specifically, it felt was inaccurate.

Jackson ultimately left his job as a security guard at the hospital after, he said, he received growing pressure as a result of blowing the whistle on what happened.  But he said he would do it again.

“We must report this. I couldn’t understand why they wouldn’t do it,” he said.  “I don’t ever want to see another child go through this here or anywhere else.”

FL Man Charged With Child Sex Abuse

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Behzad Izadi, 57

Sheriff: Palmetto man could face additional Child Abuse charges

SARASOTA COUNTY, FL  –  Behzad Izadi, 57, of Palmetto has been charged with sexual abuse in Sarasota and Manatee counties after three children disclosed he abused them during parties at his home in 2013, and at a condo he was renting on Siesta Key last year, the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office said.

Izadi was charged May 26 with three counts of lewd and lascivious molestation and one count of lewd and lascivious battery with regard to the now 14-year-old victim in Sarasota County.  He had been previously charged May 17 with two counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor for allegedly supplying drugs and alcohol to two other teens.

Detectives began investigating Izadi when the 14-year-old Sarasota child told a counselor in April that she was sexually battered at a July 4, 2016 party on Siesta Key.  The alleged victim said that she was invited to the July 4 overnight party with a group of her girlfriends.  Izadi rented the condo on Siesta Beach for the party and was the only adult present.

According to a Sheriff’s Office report:

Izadi bought alcohol for the minors and encouraged them to drink. The victim stated that she had also attended other parties with Izadi where he was “handing out Xanax” to her 13 and 14-year-old girlfriends.

On the night of the incident, the victim said she recalls Izadi touching her twice sexually while she slept on a living room couch, and once after she moved to a bedroom where her friends were sleeping.  Scared and “in shock” over the incident, she called her mother in the morning who came immediately and picked her up.

The victim said she noticed other friends had suddenly stopped hanging out around Izadi and learned of similar incidents.  A second 14-year-old victim reported being touched by Izadi while staying the night at his home.  A third 14-year-old victim said that Izadi would give her two to three Xanax at a time and supplied her with marijuana.  She said she would forget what happened to her those nights about an hour after she took the pills.

The third victim said she would recall some of the events from video snippets taken she discovered on her phone, but did not remember she and her friends “partying.”

A fourth 14-year-old teen was interviewed on May 25 and additional charges could be filed, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Izadi posted bonds totaling $27,500 in Manatee County, and was released May 17.  He was arrested May 28 in Sarasota County and remains in custody on bonds totaling $600,000.

Detectives believe there may be more victims and ask anyone with information regarding Izadi or his actions to contact them the Criminal Investigations Section at 941-861-4916.

Why So Many AntiChild Law Makers????

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Why are Children such a low priority to so many Law Makers????

Fate of Child Abuse bills frustrates
New Mexico official

ALBUQUERQUE, NM  –  The head of New Mexico’s child welfare agency is frustrated that a string of measures aimed at closing loopholes and toughening penalties for those convicted of child abuse and similar crimes failed to reach Gov. Susana Martinez’s desk.

The 60-day legislative session wrapped up March 18, leaving on the table bills that had the support of Monique Jacobson, secretary of the Children, Youth and Families Department.

“We brought forth bills that hold those who hurt our children accountable, hold those who hurt our workers accountable and make our juvenile justice system more effective,” she told The Associated Press in an interview Tuesday.  “We believe those should be priority pieces of legislation and so for them to either die or not have time to even be voted on is frustrating.”

Facing a state fiscal crisis, the Democratic-controlled Legislature spent some time wrangling over the provisions of budget plans that called for millions of dollars in tax increases and other fee hikes despite the governor’s promise not to raise taxes.

The governor chided lawmakers for wasting time on legislation she did not support, adding to the chorus of criticism from various advocacy groups that the Legislature was spending too much time on non-binding measures such as designating special songs and a state green chile cheeseburger rather than addressing serious problems stemming from poverty.

Senate Democrats have argued that key pieces of legislation are awaiting the governor’s signature, from a balanced budget to measures important to communities around the state, such as banning the possession or purchase of firearms by people under permanent protective orders for domestic violence incidents.

As for the child welfare bills, one would have made it a felony for someone to lure a child to a secluded place with the intention of raping them or committing some other illegal act.  Another would have expanded “Baby Brianna’s Law” to require mandatory life sentences for people convicted of intentional child abuse resulting in death, regardless of a child’s age.

The child welfare agency also supported a bill that would have closed a loophole in existing law regarding the transmitting of sexual images to children.

Also, the House overwhelmingly supported a bill calling for tougher punishments for abuse that didn’t result in death or great harm, but the measure stalled in the Senate.

Jacobson described photographs in which belt marks and bruises covered one boy’s legs while another boy had two black eyes.

While the state has been rocked in recent years by a wave of deadly child abuse cases, she said those that don’t have fatal results shouldn’t be minimized.

The agency receives about 20,000 calls annually that warrant further review for possible abuse or neglect.  That number has escalated nearly every year since at least 2009.

State figures show close to 30 percent of the cases reviewed during the 2016 fiscal year were substantiated, with more than 2,800 cases involving physical or sexual abuse.

Lawmakers also let languish a measure boosting protection for social workers battered or assaulted while on the job.  There have been instances in which workers have been followed home and the windows of agency cars have been shot out.

Jacobson questioned inaction on that measure given that lawmakers previously approved similar legislation to protect sports officials who are accosted.

Some lawmakers argue there’s no appetite for increasing penalties and that the focus should be on preventative measures.

Jacobson said her agency is doing what it can administratively to protect workers but that legal changes are needed to support that work and establish consequences for offenders.

“In New Mexico we need to send a message that we will not tolerate child abuse and this is an issue that matters to us as a state and yes we will focus on prevention but we also will hold people accountable,” she said.

Will NM Do Right Thing With SOL SB91

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New Mexico Law Makers have the chance to make this right, while setting an example for the whole country.

Bill clarifies statute of limitations for
Child Abuse cases

New Mexico  –  Many times, victims of childhood sex abuse don’t come forward about the abuse until they are adults, years after it happens.  In fact, that happens very frequently.

Senate Bill 91 aims to help victims get through the legal process of holding their predators accountable.

“This is an epidemic,” said Levi Monagle, an attorney who has represented dozens of adults who were victimized as children.  “One in five children will be sexually abused before the age of 18 and only 12 percent of that abuse is ever reported to authorities.”

Right now, New Mexico’s statute of limitations to allow a victim to hold his or her abuser accountable in civil court is vague.  Sometimes victims are turned away by lawyers because New Mexico’s laws aren’t on their side.

“In our line of work, we have spoken to a lot of individuals who have been sexually abused as children and because of the statute of limitations did not have viable legal claims,” Monagle said.

SB 91 aims to add clarification.  The victim would have three years after first telling a medical provider or licensed psychological professional about the abuse to file a legal claim.

“This costs the state nothing.  This is a free fix for a serious problem,” Monagle said.  “We have the opportunity with a bill like SB 91 to protect children and protect access to the courts in a very powerful way.”

The bill cleared a House committee Wednesday and now heads to the full House for a final vote.  If passed, the governor can either veto or sign it into law.

Washington Teacher Accused Of Child Sexual Abuse

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Washington Teacher Accused Of Child Sexual Abuse

Teacher at D.C. charter school arrested on
Child Sex Abuse charges

Washington, DC  –  A teacher at a high-performing D.C. charter school was arrested Friday on charges of child sex abuse, according to police and school officials.

Police said Saturday that Manuel Garcia Fernandez, 35, had sexual contact on multiple occasions with two female victims and one male victim from Aug. 17 to Feb. 6.  He was charged with three counts of second-degree child sexual abuse.

Fernandez taught at a Northeast Washington campus of the Latin American Montessori Bilingual (LAMB) Public Charter School, according to an email to parents from the school’s executive director, Diane Cottman.  The school’s website listed him as an elementary teacher.

Fernandez has been banned from LAMB’s premises, Cottman wrote Friday.  She said the school had communicated with parents in the “impacted community,” but could not disclose further details.

“We know that this will raise many questions which we are currently not at liberty to answer and or may not be able to answer,” she wrote.  “These allegations have deeply affected the entire LAMB community — the board, teachers, parents and students alike.  LAMB is committed to its families, and the safety and well-being of our students is our paramount concern.”

Cottman did not respond to a request for comment.

LAMB, which also has a campus in Northwest, enrolled a total of about 375 students in preschool through fifth grade last school year. It is one of the most highly regarded charter schools in the city.